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I've read all the posts that recommend a square setup for winter tires and the benefit of being able to rotate and extend life. While I understand that, is there some sort of problem with or disadvantage to a staggered Winter setup if they are available in the same staggered sizes as stock? There are 265/35-19 and 295/30-19 Winter tires available for the V3. Is the 295 in the rear too wide for the winter, in other words, is a skinnier winter tire safer or bite/grip more??

Thanks in advance.
 

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I've read all the posts that recommend a square setup for winter tires and the benefit of being able to rotate and extend life. While I understand that, is there some sort of problem with or disadvantage to a staggered Winter setup if they are available in the same staggered sizes as stock? There are 265/35-19 and 295/30-19 Winter tires available for the V3. Is the 295 in the rear too wide for the winter, in other words, is a skinnier winter tire safer or bite/grip more??

Thanks in advance.

Holy cow. I remember you! Welcome back. I have no useful info for you though since I don’t drive in the snow :)


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Hello,

I drive all 4 wheels in 265/35 19 last Winter. It was OK for a Car with some much Power, but of course you have to be careful with the Throttle. I think it makes no sense to Drive the 295 in the Back, and one benefit is, that you can change from front to back for a longer drive. Best Regards Marco from Europe
 

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Narrower tires perform better in deeper snow.
 

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I've been running snow tires on my performance cars forever. Starting with my 98 C5. I ran the summer tire sizes on my 98 C5 and my 02 Z06 (which had a Vortech blower and made >600HP), and now on my 14 V Coupe. My rationale is as follows: I'm not going to be driving on snow very much, even in the dead of winter. A day or two and the roads are clear. So even in winter time, I'm going to be doing most of my driving on dry pavement just like in the summer time. If I square up all 4 corners, I'm asking for an extra tail-happy car, which is arguably dangerous. And getting the fronts to wear at the same rate as the rears is a year-round challenge, not confined to winter driving. I would argue the tire type doesn't matter.
 
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