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The 6000 series Tilton slaves are adjustable, which is nice. I like to keep tolerances tight, was planning to install one of these regardless of the clutch type, screw adjust with lock nut design, super cool.

My main concern is the input shaft pilot length and how far up the shaft the splines extend to engage disks. The overall hight of the slave is approx 0.6" more than stock, thick aluminum base. I always measure for gap prior to install, so it's not too much more effort, good practice to always measure for gap any how. The Tilton flywheel plate is raised and the slave has a thicker base plate, so the gap distance seems to average out. But my main fear is that if the splines don't extend far enough up the input shaft, it's a big no go! Glad you raised the concern, may have saved me much aggravation, time, and money!

Both Tick and Tilton assured me, but I will call in the morning, make sure there was not miscommunication.
I'm trying to understand how a twin/dual line Slave works with a single line Master? I don't know of any aftermarket Master for these cars. Matter-o-fact, I just got my 6060 back from Tick (full rebuild ++) and we talked slaves and is there one I should upgrade to? The answer was no. Now I have the McLeod RXT (just had it rebuilt also $600), and maybe he didn't mention the Tilton because he knew I was keeping my clutch. That sure looks like a sweet set up tho. I'm real interested to hear how it works. Best of luck, because I'm with you... I'M DONE PULLING THIS FUCKING TRANS OUT!!! Actually thinking of selling the car after break-in is complete.. Thinking V3 with only 3 mods... Exhaust, CAI, pulley and tune, then drive..
Good luck,
Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I'm trying to understand how a twin/dual line Slave works with a single line Master? I don't know of any aftermarket Master for these cars. Matter-o-fact, I just got my 6060 back from Tick (full rebuild ++) and we talked slaves and is there one I should upgrade to? The answer was no. Now I have the McLeod RXT (just had it rebuilt also $600), and maybe he didn't mention the Tilton because he knew I was keeping my clutch. That sure looks like a sweet set up tho. I'm real interested to hear how it works. Best of luck, because I'm with you... I'M DONE PULLING THIS FUCKING TRANS OUT!!! Actually thinking of selling the car after break-in is complete.. Thinking V3 with only 3 mods... Exhaust, CAI, pulley and tune, then drive..
Good luck,
Jeff
Yeah, the fun game of constant performance vehicle maintenance is definitely not for everyone, especially if you have other activities in life. The stock slaves work well and hold-up for the most part. Tick most likely was helping you safe a little money and potential aggravation, especially if working on your car is not your obsession.
 

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Thinking V3 with only 3 mods... Exhaust, CAI, pulley and tune, then drive..
Famous last words..... I only need this chair, and this lamp, and this dog........
 

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Famous last words..... I only need this chair, and this lamp, and this dog........
No dog just the chair and the lamp..LOL I'll hold to it.. Never said that on this car, knew I was going to play and mod it.. But I feel I went too far.
 
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Yeah, the fun game of constant performance vehicle maintenance is definitely not for everyone, especially if you have other activities in life. The stock slaves work well and hold-up for the most part. Tick most likely was helping you safe a little money and potential aggravation, especially if working on your car is not your obsession.
No I love it, Just getting older (55) and pulling trans or motor out in my garage, no lift, on floor.. been there done that since I was 15.. I'm good.. :)
Eli and the guys at Tick are awesome!! I highly recommend them for any manual trans work you need done. And if you drive up to drop off your trans in Mt Airy NC, you can go to the Andy Griffith museum (Mayberry).. good stuff. Did he mention using Schaeffer fluid in your trans? They sent ATF and 70/90 to me to use, said he likes it much better than what he (Eli) has used in the past.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
EDIT: 9/22/22 CLUTCH FITS, I was wrong. All my calculations were incorrect.

Unfortunately the ST-246 clutch will not work in a V2. I made a diagram (see attached). As you can see, any clutch design used with a stock CTS-V2 TR6060, the hub on the most forward disk facing the pilot bearing 'must' extend a minimum of 1.7" from the rear surface face of the pilot bearing in order to insure that the entire width of the disk hub makes positive contact with the spines on the input shaft. The Tilton ST-246 (55-2010) kit clutch only extends 1.5" and will not work for this reason, even though it's possible to achieve a proper air-gap with the kitted 6000 series slave.

On a side note, the V2 input shaft only extends into the pilot bearing 0.3" of which only 0.2" makes contact with the ID of the pilot bearing, 0.1" is tapered.

For those that would like a bleeder, the TILTON PN: 60-6105 hydraulic/throwout bearing assembly will fit as a direct replacement for an OEM stock slave setup. The 60-6105 as advertised is for use with the T-56 but will work for a V2 TR6060, the mount pattern is the same, cylinder ID is not a problem, and the throw/reach can be adjusted for proper air-gap when installed using a stock clutch or RXT/RXT-HD clutch assembly.
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That illustration above has been buggin me so much because it ain’t right… and neither is the “barely engages the pilot” something is being misunderstood. However, I’ve been waiting until I got to the proper place in my own build so that I could compare notes.

Below are measurements taken directly from my build as I finally got to the point of pulling the engine off the stand…
the input shaft is NOT giving the crankshaft “just the tip”, it’s IN there.

Now, I could’ve driven the input bearing ‘fully home’ and that would have made a small difference (.180?) but it would not have moved ahead of the shaft.
Maybe the trans being supplied matches that drawing, but I hope not.

below is how mine fits up, stock 2011 CTS-V TR6060 and the LSX block with a Brodix crank.
~Forgive my hasty sketching~
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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
That illustration above has been buggin me so much because it ain’t right… and neither is the “barely engages the pilot” something is being misunderstood. However, I’ve been waiting until I got to the proper place in my own build so that I could compare notes.

Below are measurements taken directly from my build as I finally got to the point of pulling the engine off the stand…
the input shaft is NOT giving the crankshaft “just the tip”, it’s IN there.

Now, I could’ve driven the input bearing ‘fully home’ and that would have made a small difference (.180?) but it would not have moved ahead of the shaft.
Maybe the trans being supplied matches that drawing, but I hope not.

below is how mine fits up, stock 2011 CTS-V TR6060 and the LSX block with a Brodix crank.
~Forgive my hasty sketching~
View attachment 161489
View attachment 161488
View attachment 161491
View attachment 161490 View attachment 161492
Sorry I've caused you some grief. My measurements are accurate. I've included another diagram. Also, I am confused, the last image you posted? (see attached)

Image of properly installed pilot bearing, don't mind the seeping bearing grease smear, the bearing has been replaced.
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"Just the tip" eh?

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
"Just the tip" eh?

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
Yeah, for this very reason I decided against using a bronze bushing. My concern being the minimum protrusion front load with soft bronze will not wear well. If the input shaft extended further forward into the bushing, bronze would be ideal in my opinion. I wanted to use the bronze to insure no damage to the input shaft or chance of scattered bearings during a potential pilot bearing failure.

I believe in a perfect world keeping the clutch assembly as close to the engine block/flywheel is ideal. I imagine clutch assembly setback away from the block must create a measurable amount of stress that is not helpful at thousands of rpm's. For example, the aftermarket TR6060 bell housing is less deep and allows the clutch assembly to be closer to the block. It's obvious GM used a deep bell V2 housing and rear transmission design in order to extend the shifter as far rearward as humanly possible to accommodate the design.
 

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1. the photo I included did not focus properly so it’s useless. I’ll try again for clarity. The straight edge is on the step of the crank… that’s NOT the bearing you see, it’s the crank. The bearing is installed flush with the crank extension. You can drive it a slight amount further below flush, but nothing gained.
The earlier illustration and text said the stock set up was “just the tip” but that’s not quite accurate.
The new illustration suggests installing a small bushing deep into position “A” And I guess that’s what the first illustration was referring to? …. but why in the world would that be done? I’ll assume there are bushings designed for position “b” if you want to go bronze(?) I mean I get it, bronze pilots virtually never fail. I would have probably looked for bronze except that Monster sent the bearing.
But then, the bearings have a pretty stellar record, themselves, though I HAVE changed a couple over the years. I’m following your journey, interesting build. Really curious about the clutch slave setup.
I am at this moment trying to figure out just how in the heck to get fluid into this no-bleeder slave in order to bench bleed it(!) Filling the fitting, line removed…. pumping the slave has no effect on the fluid standing in the port. So weird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
1. the photo I included did not focus properly so it’s useless. I’ll try again for clarity. The straight edge is on the step of the crank… that’s NOT the bearing you see, it’s the crank. The bearing is installed flush with the crank extension. You can drive it a slight amount further below flush, but nothing gained.
The earlier illustration and text said the stock set up was “just the tip” but that’s not quite accurate.
The new illustration suggests installing a small bushing deep into position “A” And I guess that’s what the first illustration was referring to? …. but why in the world would that be done? I’ll assume there are bushings designed for position “b” if you want to go bronze(?) I mean I get it, bronze pilots virtually never fail. I would have probably looked for bronze except that Monster sent the bearing.
But then, the bearings have a pretty stellar record, themselves, though I HAVE changed a couple over the years. I’m following your journey, interesting build. Really curious about the clutch slave setup.
I am at this moment trying to figure out just how in the heck to get fluid into this no-bleeder slave in order to bench bleed it(!) Filling the fitting, line removed…. pumping the slave has no effect on the fluid standing in the port. So weird.
Don't bleed it prior to install, it needs to be compressed when taking air-gap measurements. After measurements and installation complete, just use a vacuum for a no bleeder type slave.

As far as the pilot bearing I am using, it is the larger diameter bearing as shown in the image I posted. The smaller diameter bearing can only be used if the input shaft is longer. The tip of the input shaft has a .10" tapered tip, .20" is the total amount of input shaft that actually makes contact with the pilot bearing. A total of .30" of input shaft extends into the pilot bearing "B" when properly installed. A common error when installing the larger diameter pilot bearings is not pressing them past the crank taper (see previous images).
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited)
1. the photo I included did not focus properly so it’s useless. I’ll try again for clarity. The straight edge is on the step of the crank… that’s NOT the bearing you see, it’s the crank. The bearing is installed flush with the crank extension. You can drive it a slight amount further below flush, but nothing gained.
The earlier illustration and text said the stock set up was “just the tip” but that’s not quite accurate.
The new illustration suggests installing a small bushing deep into position “A” And I guess that’s what the first illustration was referring to? …. but why in the world would that be done? I’ll assume there are bushings designed for position “b” if you want to go bronze(?) I mean I get it, bronze pilots virtually never fail. I would have probably looked for bronze except that Monster sent the bearing.
But then, the bearings have a pretty stellar record, themselves, though I HAVE changed a couple over the years. I’m following your journey, interesting build. Really curious about the clutch slave setup.
I am at this moment trying to figure out just how in the heck to get fluid into this no-bleeder slave in order to bench bleed it(!) Filling the fitting, line removed…. pumping the slave has no effect on the fluid standing in the port. So weird.
The 6 bolt crank picture you posted may actually use the "A" type smaller diameter pilot bearing if that's the crank you're planning to use? If that's the crank your planning to use then install the Tilton 55-2010 Kit setup, it might work? Just make sure to order the six bolt option ST-246. Can't be sure, input shaft length on the V2 TR6060 could still pose a problem? Why are you using a six bolt crank any way?
 

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I’m using a 6-bolt LS Crank. The recess for the bearing is 0.65, as is the new eight-bolt I have here.
Here’s a pic of the original factory-installed LSA with bearing…. it seems to be the same except for the bolt count.
This pic shows where the pilot has been running on the input shaft for all these years.
I don’t quite get what prior sketch means, but no matter, it’s all good.
Let’s get these cars RUNNING!! I am so ready for that blower to show up!

Anyone have a spare Maggie blower laying around??

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
1. the photo I included did not focus properly so it’s useless. I’ll try again for clarity. The straight edge is on the step of the crank… that’s NOT the bearing you see, it’s the crank. The bearing is installed flush with the crank extension. You can drive it a slight amount further below flush, but nothing gained.
The earlier illustration and text said the stock set up was “just the tip” but that’s not quite accurate.
The new illustration suggests installing a small bushing deep into position “A” And I guess that’s what the first illustration was referring to? …. but why in the world would that be done? I’ll assume there are bushings designed for position “b” if you want to go bronze(?) I mean I get it, bronze pilots virtually never fail. I would have probably looked for bronze except that Monster sent the bearing.
But then, the bearings have a pretty stellar record, themselves, though I HAVE changed a couple over the years. I’m following your journey, interesting build. Really curious about the clutch slave setup.
I am at this moment trying to figure out just how in the heck to get fluid into this no-bleeder slave in order to bench bleed it(!) Filling the fitting, line removed…. pumping the slave has no effect on the fluid standing in the port. So weird.
The McLeod bronze pilot bushing is designed to fit both small and large crank diameter, a combined design. (see attached image)
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I’m using a 6-bolt LS Crank. The recess for the bearing is 0.65, as is the new eight-bolt I have here.
Here’s a pic of the original factory-installed LSA with bearing…. it seems to be the same except for the bolt count.
This pic shows where the pilot has been running on the input shaft for all these years.
I don’t quite get what prior sketch means, but no matter, it’s all good.
Let’s get these cars RUNNING!! I am so ready for that blower to show up!

Anyone have a spare Maggie blower laying around??

View attachment 161515






View attachment 161508
Is there an advantage using the 6 bolt crank for your build?
 

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Why are you using a six bolt crank any way?
I was building a 4.125/4.0 427, I’m not aware of a 4” stroke 8-bolt offered by anyone, but more specifically I wanted a fully counterweighted crank so that limited the offerings even more.

The crank is a Brodix 4” stroke, 8 counterweight Billet piece and not offered in 8-bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I was building a 4.125/4.0 427, I’m not aware of a 4” stroke 8-bolt offered by anyone, but more specifically I wanted a fully counterweighted crank so that limited the offerings even more.

The crank is a Brodix 4” stroke, 8 counterweight Billet piece and not offered in 8-bolt.
Above my pay grade. Glad its working out for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
There IS one 4” stroke 8-bolt crank offered by Texas Speed and I bought one as part of my original build plan (a 418ci LSA build) but after I decided to build an LSX iron-block 2650 beast, I wanted the beefiest crank I could afford.
I just have the stock LSX as you know. Maybe one day I will have the opportunity to build it up a bit? Any how, I posted an unrelated thread titled,

"LSX376-B15 Rear Engine Cover Question?"

Maybe you could check it out since you have an LSX block? I suspect it has to due with pressure.
 
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