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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few were curious about the Tilton ST-246 ceramic clutch w/ 6000 series hydraulic cylinder 'Tilton kit #55-2010' I recently purchased from Tick Performance. So here are a few unboxing pictures and tidbits.

The Cover is machined aluminum and secured with bolts. The kit includes all installation hardware and throwout bearing.

The Tilton throwout bearing has a flat diaphragm contact surface measuring 3.0" diameter, stock is 2.0" diameter.

The Tilton hydraulic cylinder ID is 1.4" diameter, stock is 1.2" diameter.

The kit hardware includes ARP Pro series flywheel bolts 0.86" under bolt head length.
NOTE: I currently have ARP-234-2801 flywheel bolts installed for my McLeod, they are 1.125" under bolt head length. I prefer having the extra 1/4" of bolt in my flywheel, I don't know why, I just do. I will be installing the Tilton clutch re-using my 1.125" ARP bolts.

Overall kit parts and packaging is solid. A few engineering differences between manufacturing companies, both have sound performance records.

I will also be installing a McLeod bronze bushing this go around vs a pilot bearing, just because I can.

If anyone is interested in purchasing my used RST (Not) RXT let me know. McLeod can re-build it for less than new cost, might save some money, I can send it directly to them. The RST is a good replacement for stock clutch up to maybe 650hp range, anything more I'd suggest spending the extra for an RXT.

Don't know why Tilton doesn't include the V2 in their product marketing for the ST-246 clutch/kit, forgot to ask? However, they assured me it will fit and work for the V2.

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A few were curious about the Tilton ST-246 ceramic clutch w/ 6000 series hydraulic cylinder 'Tilton kit #55-2010' I recently purchased from Tick Performance. So here are a few unboxing pictures and tidbits.

The Cover is machined aluminum and secured with bolts. The kit includes all installation hardware and throwout bearing.

The Tilton throwout bearing has a flat diaphragm contact surface measuring 3.0" diameter, stock is 2.0" diameter.

The Tilton hydraulic cylinder ID is 1.4" diameter, stock is 1.2" diameter.

The kit hardware includes ARP Pro series flywheel bolts 0.86" under bolt head length.
NOTE: I currently have ARP-234-2801 flywheel bolts installed for my McLeod, they are 1.125" under bolt head length. I prefer having the extra 1/4" of bolt in my flywheel, I don't know why, I just do. I will be installing the Tilton clutch re-using my 1.125" ARP bolts.

Overall kit parts and packaging is solid. A few engineering differences between manufacturing companies, both have sound performance records.

I will also be installing a McLeod bronze bushing this go around vs a pilot bearing, just because I can.

If anyone is interested in purchasing my used RST (Not) RXT let me know. McLeod can re-build it for less than new cost, might save some money, I can send it directly to them. The RST is a good replacement for stock clutch up to maybe 650hp range, anything more I'd suggest spending the extra for an RXT.

Don't know why Tilton doesn't include the V2 in their product marketing for the ST-246 clutch/kit, forgot to ask? However, they assured me it will fit and work for the V2.

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Those ceramic pucks will be grabby. Hope it drives well!

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those ceramic pucks will be grabby. Hope it drives well!

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
Yeah, I figured most likely, just have to adjust how I operate. It's not daily driver fortunately. I just don't want to replace the clutch again any time soon. After replacing the head gaskets recently, I'm still trying to muster the motivation to do the clutch job. Even with a one piece shaft and v-bands, still a lot of work. Going to replace the diff and trans oil as well, even though it's probably perfect. Next project after the clutch will be the forward cradle and control arm replacement.
 

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Those ceramic pucks will be grabby. Hope it drives well!

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
Interesting note Jesse, as my experience with this type of clutch technology, dating back to the early 1970's, brought with it just what you stated. After attempting to make them work, we gave up, and moved back to the modified long lever style, Ford 3-Lever clutches we built, as they worked the best for us back then.

Modified Torque Converters were still in their infancy back then,
and many still ran manual 4 or 5 Speeds, requiring a clutch.

However, like everything else, much has changed since then.. :)

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Yeah, I figured most likely, just have to adjust how I operate. It's not daily driver fortunately. I just don't want to replace the clutch again any time soon. After replacing the head gaskets recently, I'm still trying to muster the motivation to do the clutch job. Even with a one piece shaft and v-bands, still a lot of work. Going to replace the diff and trans oil as well, even though it's probably perfect. Next project after the clutch will be the forward cradle and control arm replacement.
And you will then stay, a 'Busy Boy'..lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
And you will then stay, a 'Busy Boy'..lol
For sure! Spent the past two weeks stressed about kittyboy, four vet trips 2k. Turns out he's getting on in the years too, cat years 56. Now he's on a modified diet and eating like a teenager again, as well as constantly wanting my attention. I never really knew how much that cat means to me, had him 11 years now since a kitten. I can't let him down, after all, my car is named after him.

i was checking out some of Tilton's 'real' race clutches, huge difference in design for purpose built stuff, very interesting, can't imagine what that level of clutch must cost! I guess one of the main considerations for consumer is the 'inertia' factor in design?
 

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For sure! Spent the past two weeks stressed about kittyboy, four vet trips 2k. Turns out he's getting on in the years too, cat years 56. Now he's on a modified diet and eating like a teenager again, as well as constantly wanting my attention. I never really knew how much that cat means to me, had him 11 years now since a kitten. I can't let him down, after all, my car is named after him.

i was checking out some of Tilton's 'real' race clutches, huge difference in design for purpose built stuff, very interesting, can't imagine what that level of clutch must cost! I guess one of the main considerations for consumer is the 'inertia' factor in design?
Pets tend to hold a special place in many homes.
They do in fact, become a member of the family, in many cases!

Not exactly sure of what you mean by 'Inertia Factor', regarding a clutch for the consumer side of the market. . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pets tend to hold a special place in many homes.
They do in fact, become a member of the family, in many cases!

Not exactly sure of what you mean by 'Inertia Factor', regarding a clutch for the consumer side of the market. . .
It seems to the best of my understanding it is primarily having to due with the mass/weight. My guess is a smoother transition with more mass/weight for consumer driving vs lighter weight for performance racing that requires constant abrupt high power gear changes where a lighter weight clutch might be more beneficial? It's almost scary to visualize a 60lb clutch at WOT and the outward gravity force!
 

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Looks impressive!
I'm just going to add that I have some concern about them selling you a Camaro clutch and saying "oh don't worry, it'll work!"
Monster would strongly disagree.
I would need some serious convincing and an ironclad guarantee before I would try it.
According to Monster and other sources, the V's bell housing and slave are demonstrably different from the gen 5 camaro and NOT interchangeable or mixable.
Flywheel bolt pattern not withstanding, the slave, pressure plate and the bell housing are supposedly not a match.

I'm not trying to dump on your clutch, it looks amazing...but I'm very concerned about any supplier making blanket fitment claims when it sounds like they are just assuming.
 

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It seems to the best of my understanding it is primarily having to due with the mass/weight. My guess is a smoother transition with more mass/weight for consumer driving vs lighter weight for performance racing that requires constant abrupt high power gear changes where a lighter weight clutch might be more beneficial? It's almost scary to visualize a 60lb clutch at WOT and the outward gravity force!
Simply put, a heavy clutch will have more inertia when rotating at speed (ie idle), so that mass wants to keep rotating at a constant rate (ignoring frictional losses). When you release the clutch, that interia - the flywheel wanting to continue to rotate - is more forgiving as the clutch engages to help move the car and reduce the likelihood of a stall.

But of course that heavy clutch and rotational inertia are counter productive for acceleration, ergo the age-old dilemma.

I went with a heavy flywheel after hating a lighter weight flywheel / ceramic clutch combo.

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Simply put, a heavy clutch will have more inertia when rotating at speed (ie idle), so that mass wants to keep rotating at a constant rate (ignoring frictional losses). When you release the clutch, that interia - the flywheel wanting to continue to rotate - is more forgiving as the clutch engages to help move the car and reduce the likelihood of a stall.

But of course that heavy clutch and rotational inertia are counter productive for acceleration, ergo the age-old dilemma.

I went with a heavy flywheel after hating a lighter weight flywheel / ceramic clutch combo.

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
Very clear explanation. Same here on the flywheel, the Tilton is steel, I was advised to stay away from aluminum for that reason. With the ceramic installed soon, planning an empty parking lot day, concerned I'll drop the clutch and rear end everyone until I get used to it, plus I'm developing left foot neuropathy. haha
 

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It seems to the best of my understanding it is primarily having to due with the mass/weight. My guess is a smoother transition with more mass/weight for consumer driving vs lighter weight for performance racing that requires constant abrupt high power gear changes where a lighter weight clutch might be more beneficial? It's almost scary to visualize a 60lb clutch at WOT and the outward gravity force!
Okay, now I understand what you meant..:)

Years ago the early V8 Corvettes came with a simple cast iron, not a nodular flywheel.
People would take those early Corvettes to the drag strip, and wind the engines up real good.

The flywheel and clutch assembly would then explode like a grenade.

Being as the flywheel and clutch housing sat directly under the dashboard, the clutch and flywheel would explode, go up through the dashboard, and exit through the windshield. Those sights were not only not pretty, but a few people also were hurt very badly.
 
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Simply put, a heavy clutch will have more inertia when rotating at speed (ie idle), so that mass wants to keep rotating at a constant rate (ignoring frictional losses). When you release the clutch, that interia - the flywheel wanting to continue to rotate - is more forgiving as the clutch engages to help move the car and reduce the likelihood of a stall.

But of course that heavy clutch and rotational inertia are counter productive for acceleration, ergo the age-old dilemma.

I went with a heavy flywheel after hating a lighter weight flywheel / ceramic clutch combo.

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
At the stoplight; heavy car, light flywheel, temperamental 'Puk' clutch, along with a numerically low rear gear. . . .Most likely not going to work..lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Looks impressive!
I'm just going to add that I have some concern about them selling you a Camaro clutch and saying "oh don't worry, it'll work!"
Monster would strongly disagree.
I would need some serious convincing and an ironclad guarantee before I would try it.
According to Monster and other sources, the V's bell housing and slave are demonstrably different from the gen 5 camaro and NOT interchangeable or mixable.
Flywheel bolt pattern not withstanding, the slave, pressure plate and the bell housing are supposedly not a match.

I'm not trying to dump on your clutch, it looks amazing...but I'm very concerned about any supplier making blanket fitment claims when it sounds like they are just assuming.
Find out soon enough...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Find out soon enough...
@MrSurly
I'll give them another call in the morning, had a similar issue with ACT in the past. The only major problem difference to cause an issue with fit would be the input shaft. I don't have any picture references or specs to compare between the V2 and gen5 shafts. Tick will most definitely know.
 

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@MrSurly
I'll give them another call in the morning, had a similar issue with ACT in the past. The only major problem difference to cause an issue with fit would be the input shaft. I don't have any picture references or specs to compare between the V2 and gen5 shafts. Tick will most definitely know.
Well I know Tick is a big outfit and smart people.
The issue that I was told about had to do with the installed length or ‘height’ of the slave and the pressure plate on the V versus Camaro and measuring and stacking of shims, possibly pulling and installing extra times… it sounded like a huge pain. There was a time when Monster switched to only selling their V clutches WITH the slave as a matched set, because of the issues.
There was a new-in-box but older ctsv Monster S triple on ebay w/o slave. Called them to see about buying the slave to match. They explained it was a great deal of trouble, not simple at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well I know Tick is a big outfit and smart people.
The issue that I was told about had to do with the installed length or ‘height’ of the slave and the pressure plate on the V versus Camaro and measuring and stacking of shims, possibly pulling and installing extra times… it sounded like a huge pain. There was a time when Monster switched to only selling their V clutches WITH the slave as a matched set, because of the issues.
There was a new-in-box but older ctsv Monster S triple on ebay w/o slave. Called them to see about buying the slave to match. They explained it was a great deal of trouble, not simple at all.
The 6000 series Tilton slaves are adjustable, which is nice. I like to keep tolerances tight, was planning to install one of these regardless of the clutch type, screw adjust with lock nut design, super cool.

My main concern is the input shaft pilot length and how far up the shaft the splines extend to engage disks. The overall hight of the slave is approx 0.6" more than stock, thick aluminum base. I always measure for gap prior to install, so it's not too much more effort, good practice to always measure for gap any how. The Tilton flywheel plate is raised and the slave has a thicker base plate, so the gap distance seems to average out. But my main fear is that if the splines don't extend far enough up the input shaft, it's a big no go! Glad you raised the concern, may have saved me much aggravation, time, and money!

Both Tick and Tilton assured me, but I will call in the morning, make sure there was not miscommunication.
 
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