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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I would like this thread to be a place to gather and share information specific to the Tilton 55-2010 clutch kit and other comparable ceramic V clutch options. I've included some images and plan to update regularly to share interesting Tilton clutch experience information, as well as, try to answer questions. I believe I am the first to install this clutch kit in a CTS-V2. There's not currently information available. Maybe in time others will install the Tilton and post.

The Tilton Clutch Kit #55-2010 was purchased from Tick Performance and "DOES" fit a CTS-V2 with no modifications required. I confirm the fit and operation on my 2011 CTS-V2.

Kit Details:
•Ceramic solid dual disks
•Machined aluminum cover/diaphragm secured to a chromoly flywheel with bolts. Kit includes ARP Pro bolts to secure flywheel to crank.
•Series 6000 Tilton adjustable hydraulic cylinder/throwout bearing assembly includes line adaptor fitting for use with OEM master cylinder line.

It's a complete clutch/slave kit $1900.00 drop shipped, so make sure to be aware the return policy. No additional parts are required to install this kit.

Suggest purchasing Tick's bleeder line extension PN: #TPSBL

NOTE: All clutch bolts are standard 12 and 6 point. ARP metric
 

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Premium Member
2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
Joined
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738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Not sure what kind of power you are making but it should do well in the 3 digit realm
I suspect high 3 realm for sure. I'm planning a comfort zone once I break-in the clutch, step back a little. After my experience with the lifted head, I am dialing back timing a few degrees this go around. I have way more power than I can use on the street already. With the new clutch I should be in a position to smoke just about any challenges if I'm in the mood to entertain.
 

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Premium Member
2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
Joined
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738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I wanted to share a detail with those familiar installing the manual clutches on a V2.

My previous McLeod clutch extended 4.65" beyond the surface plane of the engine as measured to the fingers of the diaphragm spring for air-gap, I assume the stock clutch has a similar measurement. The Tilton clutch only extends 3.95" beyond the engine plane. Nice thing is with the lower profile Tilton clutch, no more issues clearing the input shaft, it makes the job so much easier!

Just thought I'd throw it out there.
 

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Premium Member
2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
Joined
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738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
"Gear Rattle"
My experience with the ST-246 ceramic clutch. Right out the gate I experienced what is defined as "Gear Rattle." Something to consider when making a decision on clutch options. The rattle I experience is not traumatic, but was initially concerning having no previous ceramic clutch experience. It has noticeably reduced after 50 miles of city and highway driving.

I have attached an image of my installed Tilton hydraulic cylinder piston in relation to the throw out bearing in relaxed state. Based on the part mark number stamp, Tilton estimates my air-gap at approx 0.157" Tilton recommends setting the air-gap between 0.125"-0.175". I share this measurement information to relay that I have very good clutch pedal travel and engagement. I continue to experience very smooth gear shifting without excessive "grabbing" or "jumping" in town and on the highway.

Kind-of similar moving to a one piece drive shaft and/or solid engine mounts. You'll feel it and hear it more! (haha)

Read the following written by Advance Clutch Technology, ACT regarding gear rattle:

"Increased gear rattle noise may occur when changing to an aftermarket performance clutch and/or flywheel, including ACT’s products. The most common gear rattle noise occurs when a vehicle is idling in neutral after a long drive or on a hot day. It sounds like a light knocking or growling sound. Gear rattle is an audible noise transmitted from the impacts between the transmission gear teeth. A vehicle engine’s torsional vibrations (momentary angular acceleration) pass through a transmission causing the separation and resulting impact of the gear teeth. Gear rattle is not to be confused with clutch chatter or out-of-balance vibrations; both of which are conditions mostly felt and generally, not heard. In general, gear rattle is not harmful to the transmission, but can be an annoyance to the driver. It can become a serious concern if misdiagnosed as a transmission or engine problem. Traditionally, automakers have dampened torsional vibrations by using a clutch disc with a spring-centered design and a heavy flywheel. More recently, however, many have started using a dual-mass flywheel to silence the gear rattle in the transmission. Typically, when a dual-mass flywheel is used, the clutch disc features a solid, or rigid-hub, instead of a spring-centered. When changing from a dual-mass flywheel to a solid flywheel, a spring-centered clutch will help dampen the torsional vibrations and reduce, but not eliminate, gear rattle noise. Other contributors to increased gear noise include: dual-mass flywheel to a single-mass flywheel conversion, a solid or rigid-hub center instead of a spring center, stronger dampening springs in the clutch disc, increased engine performance modifications or a lighter flywheel or clutch assembly. Gear rattle is a commonly accepted trade-off for performance. Gear rattle noise is not a manufacturer’s defect."

In addition, Tilton recommends the following:

"We recommend a 500-mile break-in (no high RPM slipping of the clutch launches)."

Yes, the Tilton recommendation does apply to "ceramic" clutches. I have read that some believe ceramic clutches are plug and play and do not require break-in. However, Tilton recommends a break-in similar to organic clutches.
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