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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Alright you turkey-stuffed cunts and cuntettes (that's you - ladies, if there are any left?) - here's my thread on Tesla. I'll probably weave in both my views and experience with the car as well as the company, since both have significant differences (both good AND bad) as compared to traditional OEMs and dealerships.

After jotting down tons of notes, I've decided that there's just no way to squeeze it into a single post, so what I've decided to do is create one post for each area of topic / interest. I have a list done already, but I'll add anything that makes reasonable sense that you guys want feedback on.

I'm going to start with a few posts at all once since more than one of you mentioned needing some extra toilet time reading! So with that, I'll start with these topics:

  • The sales/buying/purchasing experience
  • The delivery experience
  • Initial impressions
  • My first experience with service and repair
Later on, we can dive into:
  • Vehicle features
  • Performance
  • What's different about owning an EV versus a gas/diesel/liquid fueled car
  • Exterior - paint, wheels, etc
  • Interior - the coachworks aspect
  • Technology
  • Extras
What else? Post up a reply to this post with suggestions and I will edit this post to include your topic ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
So this first reply is regarding the sales and pre-purchase experience...

The first thing that was apparent to me - no one at Tesla was going to sell you a Tesla. No one was going to try and convince you to buy one, no one will rush up to you when you arrive at a showroom. There's no sense of commissions or competition for your business. This obviously is both good and bad.

The good is clearly - no sleasy salespeople trying to milk you out of your money. You'll never see a line on the paperwork for "underbody protection treatment" or those other crap ad-ons that stealerships hit you with. Zero.

The bad is that no one is hungry for your business. Right now, my impression here in Houston is that Tesla sells every car they can make. The showroom staff pretty much told me they are there to answer questions, correct misinformation, show features, and take orders. Sales really isn't a thing for them. Right now, every person who wants a Tesla is tracking down the salespeople, not the other way around.

That said - Tesla's staff actually did go way out of their way to help us. We asked about taking a deeper dive than just a 15 minute test drive. Told them I wanted to drive the car in the day and at night, and get a better feel for it. After all, I was about to plunk down a quarter million dollars - so it seemed a very reasonable request. Towards this, Tesla delivered a brand-new Model X Performance with 14 miles on it to our house and said we could keep it for the weekend. The two people who dropped it off gave us their cell phone numbers and said call or text them any time, day or night, if we had questions.

That weekend my wife drove it quite a bit, we played with all the features, and once the wife went WOR (wide open rheostat?) or whatever you call it when its not a throttle, she was sold. For a fairly large SUV, it was unbelievably quick. Easily quicker under 100mph than a new C8 vette.

One of the best ways to get to know a new product like a car is to actually read the owners manual. There is where you really learn about any caveats, restrictions, limitations, and other little bits that salespeople never mention. On the Tesla the owner's manual is electronic and accessed thru the central touchscreen. We spent a few hours pouring over it.

That was about it - no pressure, good response when we asked for it, and no hassles.

There are some downsides worth mentioning - Tesla doesn't really have lots full of cars like traditional dealerships. So while you can probably find a showroom car in the paint color you want, or with the interior color you want, it probably won't be the exact combo you want on the exact model you want.

Also - Tesla service centers and showrooms can be far apart in some areas. It's not uncommon for someone's closet place to get service to be a 2 hour drive or more. But Tesla can fix many issues by sending someone to you rather than taking the car to the shop. Lead times can be kinda long, too. It's clear Tesla needs to grow a lot more, build/create lots more service locations, and improve their processes. But OUR experience was great - we live just a few miles from a major service center in Houston and also a few miles from a major showroom. But YMMV depending on where you are.

Next I'll go into the actual buying process - but post up a reply to this one if you have questions about the sales process.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Next - buying a Tesla.

While Tesla can help you enter an order online, here in Texas, arcane blue laws prevent you from buying a Tesla IN the state of Texas. So you just order online, as you would with Amazon. We bought both of our cars on my cell phone.

The good is: The process is extremely simple. You pick your model, color, wheels, and packages and enter your bio info and a credit card number for a deposit (ours was $2500 per car). This gets the ball rolling, but you can actually change your order at any time up until manufacturing/assembly begins....you just might have to call and talk to a human if it's super close to build week.

The ordering process consists of:
  • Placing an order for the specific model, config, color, and options you want.
  • Uploading required docs – including a copy of your license/ID, proof of insurance, and financing details – whether cash or loan etc.
  • Tesla notifies you when your car’s build is imminent. In some states like Texas where direct auto sales are banned, you have to make payment before the car can be shipped. Our bank knows Tesla’s process well and had full technology integration with Tesla’s systems. That made getting a loan, transferring payment, and everything else automated and was done for us by our bank. Many large banks have similar integration that makes buying a Tesla a snap.
  • When your car is in transit or scheduled to be shipped, you get a notification to schedule your delivery appointment. This is simple – pick a date that works for you and book it online.
On delivery day, you literally just need to sign one line electronically. I did ours on the delivery rep’s cell phone. No paperwork – handoff can be 5 minutes unless you want a walk-through of all the features, but you can also just RTFM.

Overall Tesla’s buying experience is FAR superior to traditional dealerships. In some areas Tesla will deliver the car right to your work or home. In my case my wife wasn’t available to drop me so they shot me a text message with a link to grab a free Lyft or Uber to the pickup location, which was simply at the closest service center.

The Bad: Tesla’s purchasing and delivery process is clearly not mature.
One example: Once you place an order, there’s almost no indicator of status or scheduling until nearly the day your vehicle arrives for delivery - not even Tesla employees know that info.
Another example: When we ordered, the website said 2-3 weeks for delivery. But it turned out to be closer to 7-8 weeks. We later learned Tesla failed to update their website in a timely manner, and we should have been told 8 weeks from the start. But once the order is placed, no one anywhere in the chain knows jack shit about when the car will be built, where it is during shipping/transport, and so on. That needs major improvement. Thankfully flintv who bought the Whale was super patient and understanding!

This was frustrating for us, but we also knew that these cars would be built-to-order, so we had already planned to hang onto our current cars until the new ones arrived and we knew everything was aok with the new rides. But if you are in a bind to buy a new vehicle right away, this probably isn't the brand for you right now.

Ok - post up replies to this message if you have questions about my buying/ordering experience!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Next - Initial impressions, from delivery day to a week or so in....

While I'll cover some of these topics in detail later, here's a quick take on how I felt upon first seeing the car and how my first week of ownership went...

The Good: Overall our Model S was in nearly perfect shape. There were a few TINY paint issues, which were easily corrected (by me). After reading about cars delivered with various nicks, scratches, and other paint problems, I went over the car in excruciating detail. The things I found probably existed on my CTS-V, but my level of scrutiny probably wasn’t nearly as close.

The Bad: My Model S wasn’t super clean when I got it. It had a decent layer of dust on it. Many dealerships have new cars shined to a high gloss, tires dressed, etc – all to make a good impression on customers. Tesla customers appear to be the type that want to take the car home and gently caress it with angel tears and fairy wing feathers. They don’t care if the car is a little dusty or dirty upon delivery – they’re about to detail it themselves, have PPF done, a wrap, etc. Tesla coasts right now on a lot of owner fantasies about owning a Tesla, so they don’t have to try as hard. In retrospect I guess not a big deal, but it’s important to people who work and save for years to buy their dream car. I didn't care as I brought a microfiber and some instant detailer to examine the paint myself anyway.

I think the stories about Tesla paint issues do have some merit. My car is a deep red metallic, which is a hard color to get right. I can sorta see that maybe the front plastic bumper/fascia area looks to be a shade off from the aluminum bodywork. But it could be the light. Maybe I'm just looking for issues that aren't even there. Who knows, but it's fair and accurate to mention this. Also - there ARE spots where I could swear the metallic underlayer appears not quite as even as it should - like there's the tiniest bit of blotchiness to the paint. It's been cloudy here but I'll take some photos and see what you think when we have a nice, sunny day.

I did find 4 or 5 tiny paint defects - one or two fisheyes, a tiny nick in one part of the rear bumper, and a teeny raised bump on the rail about the side windows. All but the raised bump were easily addressed with 10 minutes with the Rupes and in two spots, a little wet sanding. I can only imagine how hard it is to ship a car overseas (our Audi came from Germany) or across country (Tesla from CA to the eastern side of Texas) without ANY paint damage occurring anywhere along the way. My guess is that traditional dealerships probably correct or cover up anything they find pre-delivery. Tesla doesn't seem to be under any pressure to go that far right now. That may change however as the fanboy buyers diminish and Tesla starts to court less eager buyers who still want a good EV.

As is typical of cars, there is some orange peel - but comparing it to our Audi, the Tesla red paint is smoother and nicer looking. How will it hold up? We'll see! But my first impressions are that it held up OK under deep, intense scrutiny. I would say that there are some guys on this forum that might be really OCD and complain more loudly than me. But the paint really is beautiful to me even with me potentially seeing a minor defect or two here and there.

I even hit a large semi truck tire tread that was in the dead center of the roadway that I couldn't avoid. I am pretty sure my dashcam captured it - so I'll post that video if I have it. It was a hard hit that was felt inside the car pretty strongly, but the front splitter and bumper didn't show any evidence of damage surprisingly. So far - the paint seems pretty good.

That said - my guy somehow tells me that Tesla isn't quite as good as the experienced OEM's at bodywork and painting. But these cars are also 100% aluminum bodywork so maybe that's a little tougher than steel or warrants different paint? (my hood is lighter than the V hood while being larger overall - the aluminum flexes easily under the Rupes...). Its also possible that being an extremely environmentally conscious company that Tesla simply uses paint that isn't quite as tough as what other OEM's use, but perhaps its more sustainable or environmentally friendly in their eyes.

And now is a good time to say that I didn't buy two EV's to somehow save the planet, although it can't be overlooked that there's the potential for EV's to cause less impact. But let's avoid debating things such as conflict minerals like cobalt and battery recycling and such in this thread....we can do that in the War Zone section if people really feel strongly about battling it out. I bought these two cars because we liked them, enjoyed the amazing torque, and all the features and attention to detail.

On to the interior - overall the interior of the S looked great. Yes - there ARE a few fitment issues that you probably wouldn't see on other OEM's. Again - this clearly looks like immaturity of Tesla at building cars. Everything was addressed by our service center quickly and easily, but many would say these should have been identified and sorted before delivering the car.

As you read on - realize that ALL of the issues I am going to describe are things I had already read about on various websites, forums, on Twitter, Reddit, etc. So I was 100% prepared to deal with them and nothing was a surprise. But I also want to shoot straight about what isn't up to par. Please don't think I'm glossing over what you think are serious items. It's more that I bought this car DESPITE the potential issues or problems, so I had tempered expectations going in. Your situation may be different, and by no means should you assume that my values and yours have to match. As we always say - the car has to make YOU happy, and no one else. I went in eyes open.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Last post for today is about my first service experience....

Yep, I already had to take the car in for service. But wait - it ain't like that!....

After driving the car a bit, I noticed some features seem to be absent. First, there was no traffic data showing on the nav maps, and I could swear real-time traffic data was part of the package.

So I dropped in unannounced to ask about it. Tesla took a look and said yes - I was indeed missing traffic data. At first they attributed this to a map update that wasn't applied. The tech connected to the car and forced the update, which was a multi-gig sized download. Rather than wait he said I could go and the download would finish once on my home's wi-fi.

Well the download finished but still no traffic data. And sat radio wasn't working either, plus a few other things.

Again went back to the service center unannounced. And again techs took a look immediately. I should note: at most dealerships you have to deal with a service advisor or some such nonsense. At my local Caddy dealership, you never got to speak to the tech, just the service writers. Tesla isn't like that - the tech have you bring your car inside the large, spacious service area, have you explain the issue directly to them, and you can usually hang with them or hit the lounge, which has full floor to ceiling windows looking into the service area so you can see your car at all times.

On this second visit, the techs checked again and found an unusual issue - somehow my car had been marked for "basic connectivity" and not premium, which is where you get the free OTA map updates, free traffic data, and lots more. The Model S comes with the premium data package for the life of the car, free - so it should have been done no matter what. The fix was in Tesla's cloud - so someone flipped a switch and magically my car worked properly.

So it was bad it took two visits to get this fixed. But on the good side, they checked it out immediately, without an appointment, and I got to talk directly to the techs, which was a nice change.

The second visit I wandered into the waiting area. The bathrooms were spacious and immaculately clean. Cold bottled water, free wi-fi, and couches and lounge chairs were plentiful.

Oh, and something stuck out in my brain while I was there - the entire service area, about 50,000 sq feet or so, was finished in high-grade epoxy. The cars were silent, but the tires squeeked and squealed as they turned on the epoxy. The tech said, "Oh yeah - I'm a master tech of 26 years and I LOVE working here. First - customers are amazing. Second - the floor is always clean...there's no trans fluid or engine oil leaking all over them all day long. Rarely do we ever have to touch a lubricant of any sort. Leaks are uncommon because nothing goes thru massive heat cycling like on gasoline cars." His perspective was interesting. He was also incredibly knowledgeable - he knew every detail of the cars inside and out. The only reason he didn't get mine fixed right away was because the problem wasn't in the car...

Other than the traffic data, I've noticed zero issues with my Model S.

I'm not sure what other questions I can answer about service, but hit me up and I'll do my best. Next time we can dive into the other topics, and I'll get some photos and video added, too.

Happy Turkey Day all! Now you've got a little reading material for that longer visit to the loo...
 

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I can't wait for Random's Aviator review.


 

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Great writeups! It's awesome that your wife likes the instant torque as well.

I've driven a friends Model 3 dual motor and was impressed with it. My wife got tired of the way I drove it real quick which didn't stop me from having my fun with it.

I really liked the enhanced autopilot feature which would be sweet to have on these 170 mile road trips I've been taking lately.

My friends family bought a dozen Tesla's at the same time. A few are Model S and X and I'd like to drive both and hopefully will the next time they are all together.

I'm definitely a fan and will have one in the future. Not really in the market for a different car right now as I love the V but my next purchase will most likely be a Model S.

Look forward to your continued experiences and honest reviews.
 

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Thanks for taking the time to write up your experiences. Say what you want about Elon and Tesla, but they are definitely disrupting a very mature industry, and seems mostly for the good of all consumers.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Next - Initial impressions, from delivery day to a week or so in....

While I'll cover some of these topics in detail later, here's a quick take on how I felt upon first seeing the car and how my first week of ownership went...

The Good: Overall our Model S was in nearly perfect shape. There were a few TINY paint issues, which were easily corrected (by me). After reading about cars delivered with various nicks, scratches, and other paint problems, I went over the car in excruciating detail. The things I found probably existed on my CTS-V, but my level of scrutiny probably wasn’t nearly as close.

The Bad: My Model S wasn’t super clean when I got it. It had a decent layer of dust on it. Many dealerships have new cars shined to a high gloss, tires dressed, etc – all to make a good impression on customers. Tesla customers appear to be the type that want to take the car home and gently caress it with angel tears and fairy wing feathers. They don’t care if the car is a little dusty or dirty upon delivery – they’re about to detail it themselves, have PPF done, a wrap, etc. Tesla coasts right now on a lot of owner fantasies about owning a Tesla, so they don’t have to try as hard. In retrospect I guess not a big deal, but it’s important to people who work and save for years to buy their dream car. I didn't care as I brought a microfiber and some instant detailer to examine the paint myself anyway.

I think the stories about Tesla paint issues do have some merit. My car is a deep red metallic, which is a hard color to get right. I can sorta see that maybe the front plastic bumper/fascia area looks to be a shade off from the aluminum bodywork. But it could be the light. Maybe I'm just looking for issues that aren't even there. Who knows, but it's fair and accurate to mention this. Also - there ARE spots where I could swear the metallic underlayer appears not quite as even as it should - like there's the tiniest bit of blotchiness to the paint. It's been cloudy here but I'll take some photos and see what you think when we have a nice, sunny day.

I did find 4 or 5 tiny paint defects - one or two fisheyes, a tiny nick in one part of the rear bumper, and a teeny raised bump on the rail about the side windows. All but the raised bump were easily addressed with 10 minutes with the Rupes and in two spots, a little wet sanding. I can only imagine how hard it is to ship a car overseas (our Audi came from Germany) or across country (Tesla from CA to the eastern side of Texas) without ANY paint damage occurring anywhere along the way. My guess is that traditional dealerships probably correct or cover up anything they find pre-delivery. Tesla doesn't seem to be under any pressure to go that far right now. That may change however as the fanboy buyers diminish and Tesla starts to court less eager buyers who still want a good EV.

As is typical of cars, there is some orange peel - but comparing it to our Audi, the Tesla red paint is smoother and nicer looking. How will it hold up? We'll see! But my first impressions are that it held up OK under deep, intense scrutiny. I would say that there are some guys on this forum that might be really OCD and complain more loudly than me. But the paint really is beautiful to me even with me potentially seeing a minor defect or two here and there.

I even hit a large semi truck tire tread that was in the dead center of the roadway that I couldn't avoid. I am pretty sure my dashcam captured it - so I'll post that video if I have it. It was a hard hit that was felt inside the car pretty strongly, but the front splitter and bumper didn't show any evidence of damage surprisingly. So far - the paint seems pretty good.

That said - my guy somehow tells me that Tesla isn't quite as good as the experienced OEM's at bodywork and painting. But these cars are also 100% aluminum bodywork so maybe that's a little tougher than steel or warrants different paint? (my hood is lighter than the V hood while being larger overall - the aluminum flexes easily under the Rupes...). Its also possible that being an extremely environmentally conscious company that Tesla simply uses paint that isn't quite as tough as what other OEM's use, but perhaps its more sustainable or environmentally friendly in their eyes.

And now is a good time to say that I didn't buy two EV's to somehow save the planet, although it can't be overlooked that there's the potential for EV's to cause less impact. But let's avoid debating things such as conflict minerals like cobalt and battery recycling and such in this thread....we can do that in the War Zone section if people really feel strongly about battling it out. I bought these two cars because we liked them, enjoyed the amazing torque, and all the features and attention to detail.

On to the interior - overall the interior of the S looked great. Yes - there ARE a few fitment issues that you probably wouldn't see on other OEM's. Again - this clearly looks like immaturity of Tesla at building cars. Everything was addressed by our service center quickly and easily, but many would say these should have been identified and sorted before delivering the car.

As you read on - realize that ALL of the issues I am going to describe are things I had already read about on various websites, forums, on Twitter, Reddit, etc. So I was 100% prepared to deal with them and nothing was a surprise. But I also want to shoot straight about what isn't up to par. Please don't think I'm glossing over what you think are serious items. It's more that I bought this car DESPITE the potential issues or problems, so I had tempered expectations going in. Your situation may be different, and by no means should you assume that my values and yours have to match. As we always say - the car has to make YOU happy, and no one else. I went in eyes open.
One big topic I overlooked regarding initial impressions was the panel gaps - which was a big issue for Tesla with the initial production of the Model 3. Sad to say - the Model S's panel gaps aren't commensurate with a $125k car. But they aren't bad. As before, I'll get some pics and video so you guys can judge for yourself. But my take is that they are fairly uniform, which is good - but they are simply larger gaps than I would prefer. I really should put a gauge on them and get some real data, as well as a paint thickness gauge, too so we know how thick the paint film is compared to industry standards. Will look into buying those. Calipers from Home Depot should be ok for the panel gaps. Will prolly have to order a paint thickness gauge.
 

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Um....thanks? Guess I'm slow here...

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So today I'll take a cut at going over the exterior condition with some new pics. Here the car is factory-floor, not even washed, but I did dust it off with a microfiber and Mother's Instant Detailer so you can see the finish.
For starters - this is the ONLY new car I've had where there is ZERO debris in the paint. I've had to clay bar and wax every new car to date (maybe 12 cars total?) because the paint was full of rail dust and similar shit. Not this one.
The bad - as I mentioned before, there were a few little nibs I had to work out, and one spot where the sheet metal has a tiny raised bulge that I'm just not going to be able to fix. I'll take it to one of those PDR guys - I bet they can fix it. But its SO small I can't even capture it fairly on a picture...like I said, I may be totally over-scrutinizing the paint because of stories I have heard. You look at the attached vids and photos and tell me what you think. I know paint is hard to get a feel for unless in person, but this is what we've got, so....
I realize the last couple of pics are hard to make out, but I took them at a shallow angle to capture the surface finish a little better.

As you can see - some of the fitment isn't perfect. But I'll be honest - I would imagine most of our V's have similar minor discrepancies. Hell - us wagon guys have been dealing with pulling-away tail lights for years with no easy or obvious cure. Sooner or later you just get over some things and enjoy the car.

And now that I'm looking at this first pic, that paint job on my side garage door ain't looking so hot! Look at that shitty peeling paint on the trimwork!!! Oh the joys of home ownership...

One other detail I noticed - as some may know, the full roof is a single HUGE piece of glass. So it's all glass from the back of the hood to the trunk. Three giant pieces. What I noticed when wiping the car down was there was a lot of ghosting from where I guess suction cups or some thing latched onto the glass during manufacture. You could see remnants of that. I eventually ended up buffing it with the Rupes to get it "smooth as glass" - pun intended. Never recall seeing that before, but maybe I was never looking for it. Not a big deal, just noteworthy and interesting.

So what do you think? Honest opinions only please!

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Discussion Starter #15
One last post for tonight, and that's my views on the interior.
I'll have to come back and add some pictures here for sure. But I'll take a cut with my notes tonight and get pics tomorrow.

The interior on the Model S comes in black, white (yes, TRUE white!) and the one I have, called cream. That said - like in the Gen 2 V I had with the light grey, the floor carpets and many other parts remain black or charcoal. So the seats, lower portion of the dash, upper portions of doors, and so on are light.

What's nice is that the headliner across the entire car is a deep charcoal Alcantara, which gives the otherwise plain/spartan interior a much more plush feel. The pics below aren't my car - as I think I posted elsewhere I've swapped this light wood for the dark wood trim. The wood trim has a nice, unvarnished/clearcoated finish. It's stained but otherwise doesn't have a topcoat like is customary. It goes well with the full Alcantara headliner.

As in many cars, the factory floor mats are thin and kinda cheap. But some Lloyds are en route to replace them.

While it's fixed, the full glass roof is really a nice touch. It's hard to imagine, but IIHS says the roof structure of the Tesla cars are among the strongest they've tested, supporting up to 5 times the vehicles weight. I think we have some safety experts on here who can chime in on that. This does make the pillars kinda huge - at least they look huge. But strong too I suppose.

One "feature" - depending on your perspective, is that Tesla is "vegan" - that is, no leather or animal products are used. My interior is some sort of synthetic analog. So far so good, but the car is brand new. So we will have to see how it holds up. Owners with the stark white interior say it holds up really well, but a few have reported some transfer from clothing like jeans. Maybe cheap jeans, maybe cheap seats, who knows?

Some other footnotes:

In the trunk of the car, there's a "sub trunk" - that is, lift up the floor like you might find for a spare tire well on the CTS-V wagon and you'll find a second trunk where the gas tank and spare tire might otherwise be. With 21 inch wheels, there's obviously no spare on board, just like with many similar cars. Above the trunk there's a cover like you might find on a hatch or wagon. The one in the Telsa is solid with a hinge about halfway. It flips over or can fully cover the cargo area. The point in mentioning all this is that at first they felt light, cheap, and flimsy to me. Like they would break easily. They just didn't feel as robust and substantial as the ones in our Audi or the V. If you have seen a V wagon - you know the hinged cargo area floor that you can lift up - that sort of thing.

Well today I took both Tesla's to my local tint guy. He's a huge Mexican dude - every bit of 250 lbs. He said he does a lot of Teslas and I watched as he proceeded to sit and stand on both the flimsy trunk floor and even the cargo area cover! I was totally shocked - they felt (and kinda look) cheap, but they held him up with barely any flex while he tinted the rear window (which actually raises up when the rear hatch opens on the Model S - it's shaped like a sedan, but opens like a wagon or hatchback in the rear).

The same could probably be said about the rest of the interior - it just doesn't look or impress you as rich or robust. But so far, things have held up beyond what I thought. Now a secondary aspect of the ultra-spartan interior is all about personal taste. The door panel interior is fairly plain - smooth leatherette material with some alcantara in spots and a handle to open, that's it. Not even a door pocket! But since there's no drive shaft, the central console has tons of storage. Rumor is the doors on the Model S have heavy crash reinforcement, hence the lack of a door pocket - the space was used for extra bracing. I don't know if that's true though - our Model X (which is of course larger) does have door pockets, so....

I guess the last bit is that the rear seats fold down, just like in my V wagon, and with them folded down the rear cargo volume is about as big as the wagon, with a little lower headroom where the longroof would stay high. But the one thing you can't argue is that for the size car it is, the Model S has tons of usable storage space. Front trunk, rear main trunk, rear bottom trunk, fold down sears, and center console that is pretty much 100% storage space.

Oh - a nice touch. The center console is cut back in the rear. The attached picture again isn't my car (this is an older model, too), but you can see the center front console extends back with the air vents, but the lower section scoops forward. This provides the middle rear seat occupant the exact same legroom (footroom?) as the two side rear seats. And there's no hump since there's no driveshaft so the floor is flat for everyone. The rear facing section also houses a pop-out pair of cupholders, USB ports, and climate vents and controls.

We'll cover the whole central touchscreen and dash display later - for this post I wanted to focus mainly on the interior space, materials, finish, and usability...

It's hard to get a proper picture of the full glass roof. You may see pictures online that looks like there's a cross-brace. There's not - those cars have an accessory sunshade that rolls up into a central holder. When removed, the roof is totally glass, from the back of the hood to the start of the trunk. There are two cross members for the roof - one at the sunvisor area and one behind the back seat. Those are where the three glass panels (windshield, roof, and rear window) join. So there's a seam and a crossmember at just two points. The car sits lower at the roofline than my V did, so the extra headroom and more spacious feel of the full glass roof make the car feel larger and more open inside.

I don't have much seat time driving in hot sun, but people say it rejects heat really well. Still - there's a full sunshade as an accessory that just snaps in with a flex frame, as well as the formerly mentioned roll-up model. I'll forego those unless I feel the need.

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TLDR.

:D

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How's the view out back through the rear view mirror? Looks somewhat obstructed with the back seat headrests.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
How's the view out back through the rear view mirror? Looks somewhat obstructed with the back seat headrests.
It's so-so. But the V wagon had an even smaller rear window and massive pillars behind the rear doors. Yes - it could be better, but isn't bad.

Don't forget tho - you have 360 degree camera coverage you can use while driving. Wanna see out back? Put the rear camera on the 17 inch display...

At the bottom the main screen there are several shortcuts which you can configure. One is "Cameras". Touch that, select rear., and you can view the rear camera feed at any forward speed. You can split it too so the camera just uses half or 1/3 of the screen space so that radio and climate controls, nav, or whatever else you want remains displayed.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Spent some time today going over the wife's Model X. Found two small paint defects - naturally on the hood where my OCD will make me notice them lol! Rest of the car the paint was flawless. But I think what stood out to me is the bodywork. You can see Tesla's lack of long experience not in the portions of the body panels on the outside, but moreso on parts of the body you see when things like the doors or trunk/rear hatch are open. Those show where panels are overlapped and spot welded or adhesive used. It's just not as nicely finished looking as other cars in this price class, and even some cheaper ones.

One feature that is kinda neat is that both cars have air suspensions. And the car "remembers" when you raise the suspension to clear a speed bump, driveway, or other obstacle and the next time you approach it, the suspension automatically adjusts. And you can adjust the pinned location and ride height once a location is remembered. It happens automatically so you don't have to do anything other than adjust the height.

For grins, I took a picture of the Model X at max height and lowest height. Keep in mind those are 30 inch tall tires on the Model X.

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Thought I'd add a few more shots for comparison:

First pic is the driver's side of the X where the standard front door meets the rear Falcon Wing door. The second pic is that same location on our Audi. This gives you a sense of the relative fitment of these two areas - it's tricky because the front and rear doors must be adjusted to operate properly, and sometimes proper operation of the hinges and latch doesn't necessarily give you the best visual alignment. On the Tesla it's worse because of the crazy rear doors that have hinges in two locations.

You can see on both cars there's a slight misalignment, but both are really good and fairly comparable. It must be something about the trimwork and rubber seals that Tesla uses that doesn't perhaps mask fitment issues as well? If you look at the Audi closely, it clearly has as much misalignment as the Tesla, but when you step back and look at the car, for whatever reason the Audi hides these imperfections just a little bit better...
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Instead of spending time going over her X, you should pay more attention to her V!

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