Cadillac CTS-V Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
5.3 truck motor. Haha no but depends what your plans are, crazy hp? I'd probably get an iron block... The dart blocks are nice... Or the gm lsx block. If you don't want to break 850 or so whp (driven hard often I'd say that's about the max I would go on an aluminum block with no sleeves, to feel comfortable.) I'd buy a nice rotating assy and use your block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
5.3 truck motor. Haha no but depends what your plans are, crazy hp? I'd probably get an iron block... The dart blocks are nice... Or the gm lsx block. If you don't want to break 850 or so whp (driven hard often I'd say that's about the max I would go on an aluminum block with no sleeves, to feel comfortable.) I'd buy a nice rotating assy and use your block.
Didn’t think about it that way. That’s a dilemma then dang. I want a already built short block that’s more dependable and stronger than the LSA. But is there another engine that is a drop in for the V that is more dependable?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,069 Posts
The "LSA" is basically an aluminum LS with oil squirters. So realistically, any LS3-style motor would work. The kicker is that with hypereutectic pistons and boost, those oil squirters can be a piston-saver. There are probably a few other nuances between LS and LSA blocks that I'm leaving out - but for replacement purposes the bolt patterns for heads, transmission, accessories are the same.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,427 Posts
Isn't the LSA reinforced for boost?
Yep, much stronger than LS3 block, different grade aluminum as well.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: random84 and jcs003

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Yep...

Engine highlights:

  • Enhanced Cylinder Block: the 6.2L engine block used with the LSA is cast from 319-T7 aluminum and fitted with cast-iron cylinder liners.
    • Compared to previous blocks, it has been strengthened 20 percent by optimizing the size of the bulkhead “windows” to take advantage of material thickness in the bulkhead. The enlarged bulkhead windows also improve bay-to-bay breathing by managing airflow inside the engine more efficiently, thereby decreasing pumping loss, or reducing resistance to the pistons’ downward movement.
    • The engine block was developed with the latest math-based tools and data acquired in GM’s racing programs, and it provides an exceptionally light, rigid foundation for an impressively smooth cam-in-block engine. Its deep-skirt design helps maximize strength and minimize vibration, and its aluminum construction reduces weight approximately 100 pounds compared to a conventional cast-iron cylinder block.
  • Deck Plate Honing: a precision machining process reserved for high-performance engines, is used on the LSA cylinder block to maximize engine life, reduce friction between engine parts and increase horsepower. It is advantageous in applications where cylinder head pressures are greater than average – such as with a supercharged engine – to ensure cylinder sealing and prevent scuffing of the piston against the bore wall. In the LSA engine, this means improved bore life and ring sealing. True bores and better sealing are keys to optimizing power.
  • Pistons with Oil-Spray Cooling: The LSA’s pistons are aluminum-cast from a high-silicon alloy developed for its combination of strength and heat-management properties.
    • Casting reduces noise-generating potential, compared to other high-performance piston materials, such as forged aluminum, and is specified when noise and vibration control is a priority.
    • The hypereutectic pistons are also lighter than conventional steel, which translates to less reciprocating mass inside the engine. Less mass means greater efficiency, high-rpm capability and a feeling of immediate response as the engine builds rpm.
  • Lightweight Rotating Assembly: within the LSA’s cylinder block spins a balanced, dropped-forged steel crankshaft with an eight-bolt flange to mount the flywheel.
    • The eight-bolt pattern increases clamping strength compared to naturally aspirated 6.2L V-8s, which use a six-bolt crank flange.
    • Forged powder-metal connecting rods link the crankshaft and pistons.
      • They are forged under extreme pressure from alloy metals reduced to powder, rather the melted to liquid, for a balance of low mass and high strength.
      • They reduce pressure on both the rod-end bearings and main bearings, compared to conventional rods, and allow the bearings to be optimally sized for the least amount of friction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
Reading above makes me speculate this engine can handle more than the 750 wheel I keep hearing. The liners add a great deal of strength in its own right.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,723 Posts
Reading above makes me speculate this engine can handle more than the 750 wheel I keep hearing. The liners add a great deal of strength in its own right.
While the Crankshaft and Connecting Rods are good to
about 900 HP, at or around 750 HP this block tends to
become none sufficient.
***Some do, and some don't.

In any case, we have removed engines after only
10 - 15 minutes of dyno time and found that when we
re-honed the block, the block was now found to be
out of round.

Since the liners are made of a different material then is
the block, the thin liners then expand and contract at
different rates then does the block.

When this happens the block can no longer sufficiently
support the liners. This is but one of the reasons the
liners crack. . .

Did the OP mention what HP levels he is requiring?

Cheers,
RD
 
  • Like
Reactions: random84

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,723 Posts
I only want 700whp.
Then is simply comes down to your budget Bigwilly.

I would not use an LS-3 Engine Block.
You would be going backwards on reliability.

The GM lsX Iron Block, the B-15 would be the next block
to look at, as it will easily be reliable at 700 HP and is
very cost effective.

Also, in an earlier post I offered to help you with making
a decision on your cam and heads, but you did not
answer my two questions.

You have now answered my question regarding how much
HP you require, but at what Engine RPM?

Cheers,
RD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Then is simply comes down to your budget Bigwilly.

I would not use an LS-3 Engine Block.
You would be going backwards on reliability.

The GM lsX Iron Block, the B-15 would be the next block
to look at, as it will easily be reliable at 700 HP and is
very cost effective.

Also, in an earlier post I offered to help you with making
a decision on your cam and heads, but you did not
answer my two questions.

You have now answered my question regarding how much
HP you require, but at what Engine RPM?

Cheers,
RD
“Rubber Duck” I have never really even thought about RPM. What are some factors that determine what RPM one should shoot for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
Class is now in session.


150620
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,723 Posts
“Rubber Duck” I have never really even thought about RPM. What are some factors that determine what RPM one should shoot for?
Bigwilly,
The amount of HP you desire to make is directly linked
to how much air your engine is going to inhale.

So, if you spin a given engine to a higher RPM,
it should produce more HP, as it is going to
inhale more air, or should we say the engine
will demand more air (The Demand Side).

However, as you increase the Engine RPM,
you must also increase the ability for the
'Induction System' (The Supply Side) so
that it can flow sufficient air, given as CFM.

So, if you tell me that you want to make 700 HP,
then your also telling me that you need to have
an induction system that will 'Supply' ~1050 CFM,
plus we also need to factor in a loss coefficient.

These engines seem to have about an 13%
loss coefficient. So the CFM required then
would amount to ~1210 CFM.

That value of 1210, seems to also correlate with
what a good ported 1.9L TVS Eaton will flow.
***Some I am sure flow a little better.

So you might want to drop your 700 HP Goal
down to about 660 HP unless you want to invest
into porting the blower.
***Some I am sure will state otherwise,
but that is my experience.

And some are able to squeeze out about
750 HP with the ported blower, which equals
about 100% Cylinder Fill.

All of the above HP Values assume the fuel is Gasoline.

Add a quality E85, and you should gain somewhere
between 75HP to 100HP.

Take care Mr. Big..lol

Cheers,
RD
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top