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Thanks for getting me in trouble with my wife, the picture of the blond. I had to explain it was a member sharing pictures of his wife. So she wanted to participate and share one too. aka kittygirl haha View attachment 158753
Mamacita!

You're a lucky man!

Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Looking for members who have run the lsx, dart, or even an OE iron block.
What oil pump is recommended/required?
Are there any additional cooling upgrades that are required due to the blocks material?
How does the additional weight feel on the front end?
I know @kittyboy runs an LSX B15, how has that worked out for you?
Id never use a LSA again. Walls are too thin. I prefer iron 6.0. Its only 100# weight difference. You dont notice it.
 

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2011 cts v coupe
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Treater did you go from the 6.2 to a 6.0 iron block?
 

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Id never use a LSA again. Walls are too thin. I prefer iron 6.0. Its only 100# weight difference. You dont notice it.
Just some thoughts to add to the above:
The so called walls, are simply cheap cast iron sleeves.

Those cheap cast iron sleeves also grow with increasing heat,
at a different rate then does the aluminum block. This causes
the sleeves to crack.

-The GM lsX Iron Block is a Race Bred Engine Block-
The GM lsX Iron Block, uses far superior iron then does any OEM GM Block.
Bore options for the lsX Iron Block are also much better.

As you increase the bore, and decrease the stroke one are running a
larger intake valve, as is related to the displacement of said cylinder.

Your valve area, versus swept cylinder volume is also very important.
Also valve area to stroke need to be watched carefully.

Even a cylinder head using a 2.204" intake valve, has it's limitations here.

Cheers
 

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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The -B15 long block is a good value, a low cost option, very robust. If I recall, cylinder sleeves are around 0.20" thick and siamese, beefy as hell. But if I had to do it all over again, had the time, money, and engine builder experience I would purchase just the LSX block and build it up from scratch. Also, the LSX has priority main oiling, and extra head bolt pattern. Trester, there are some recent posts within the past week or so on this subject too, check them out, might help answer a few questions. If you are financially secure, might even consider sleeving an iron block with the Darton water-jacketed sleeves?
 

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The -B15 long block is a good value, a low cost option, very robust. If I recall, cylinder sleeves are around 0.20" thick and siamese, beefy as hell. But if I had to do it all over again, had the time, money, and engine builder experience I would purchase just the LSX block and build it up from scratch. Also, the LSX has priority main oiling, and extra head bolt pattern. Trester, there are some recent posts within the past week or so on this subject too, check them out, might help answer a few questions. If you are financially secure, might even consider sleeving an iron block with the Darton water-jacketed sleeves?
Aaahhh. . .Wrong..lol

The B15 block still has the typical 90° cylinder angle, and 4.400 inch bore
spacing, and is an all iron block. This block can be bored to 4.200", well
beyond the 4.065" LSA bore.

Here we see most limiting boring to maybe 0.005", or a finished bore
size of about 4.070", because of the thin, fragile sleeves.

Yes, some piston manufacturers do make a larger piston than 4.070",
but some will not go more than the +005", as many simply feel the
engine block is a throw-away item.

LS7 blocks, which come with a 4.125" bore, are also
usually held to an overbore of 4.130", or +0.005".

Now, the question is;
why would anyone choose to sleeve a common GM Engine Block(?)
as the iron in an B15 lsX Engine Block is of far higher quality. And
the B-15 lsX Engine also comes with priority oiling. . .

Please also take note; when you sleeve an engine, your also
weakening the engine block within the main bearing web area.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

For those that might desire to read up on priority oiling,
the following link is a good read.

 
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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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I've read that the water-jacket sleeves are super nice, I know it's not cheap, an expensive mod for sure. Maybe misunderstood my sleeve feedback, I was not referring to the bore diameter potential, just the cylinder wall thickness of the LSX, it is by far a much thicker sleeve as compared to the LSA for sure, that was one of the reasons I decided to install one. I'm going to stay with the stock sleeves and bore diameter, never planned to change those, car is too fast already! In the future I am going to install a slightly higher volume oil pump and swap the dog bone however. I cooked a couple main bearing on my LSA a few years ago, my fault, not paying attention to engine and oil temperatures. I even installed an oil pan baffle this time around.
 

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I've read that the water-jacket sleeves are super nice, I know it's not cheap, an expensive mod for sure. Maybe misunderstood my sleeve feedback, I was not referring to the bore diameter potential, just the cylinder wall thickness of the LSX, it is by far a much thicker sleeve as compared to the LSA for sure, that was one of the reasons I decided to install one. I am just going to stay with the stock bore diameter, car is too fast already! haha
My comments were prompted by this statement. . ."cylinder sleeves".

The LSA 376 CID does have what some might call sleeves,
but they are actually 'Cylinder Liners'.

The GM B15 lsX Iron Block is a 'Cast Iron' Engine Block,
has no sleeves, nor liners. This block was designed by
the legendary 'Warren Johnson', of NHRA Pro stock fame.

He knows that you can't go fast unless the cylinders are sealed.
Your not sealing the cylinders, when you require multiple catch cans. . .

------------------------------------------------

I think you meant to say 0.200" thick cylinder walls.
But that value will change, dependent on how much you bore the block.

That is why I added that the B15 Engine Block still comes
with the 4.400" center to center bore dimension, so that
one can calculate the thickness of the cylinder wall, when
you bore it.
 
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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Thanks for the clarification, if all goes well, I shouldn't cook another set of main bearings hopefully. Live and learn... PS: the iron block for sure retains more heat, so far my cooling mods are working well.
 

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I know it’s not an LSX but with this LSA block I’m going to build, I’m going to try and research and hopefully get insight from you guys (can’t thank you all enough) on all the right parts to throw at the new block so I have something that is reliable but still makes decent power.
 

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Seems a lot of members have good experience with the LSA, guess it all just boils down to what level of power and endurance at the end of the day. And not being foolish like I was a few years ago! (haha)
 

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I don’t care so much about DYNO numbers but more 1/4 times. So as long as I’m in the very low 10’s or high 9’s I’m happy
 
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I've read that the water-jacket sleeves are super nice, I know it's not cheap, an expensive mod for sure.
I have never been of that groups mindset!

The stock engine blocks don't have the premium iron that the B15 does.
You weaken the main bearing area.
You can't bore the engine large enough, to fit a sufficient valve in it.

In the end, you spend as much money, have a weaker engine block,
and have restricted the induction system.

-----------------------------------------------------

-some additional thoughts for those building an engine-
Use the 2.165" valve with the 3.622" stroke.
Use the 2.204" valve, when not exceeding a 3.75" stroke.

Moving to a larger stroke makes the same amount
of HP, but at a lower engine rpm.

Only benefit here, is one can use a cheaper valve train,
as it won't be as stressed at the lower engine rpm.

Using a larger stroke, one will be attempting to 'Band Aid' a weak
induction system, with too much cam duration.
***We must increase our valve curtain area, as we increase cylinder volume.
This means either a larger intake valve, or more valve lift, assuming
the the heads flow sufficiently at the higher valve lift.
***We must increase our cam duration, as we increase crankshaft stroke.

So, with the above in mind:
A minimum bore of 4.125" is required of the 2.204" intake valve.
With a 3.75" stroke, we have an internal engine volume, of 401 CID.

The above is easy with a good aftermarket engine block, such as the B15.

Or, one can easily move the bore size up to 4.155", or even 4.185",
if one desires to improve the bore to stroke ratio even more.

Cylinder head flow requirements will also need to be improved,
as one increases the internal engine volume (CID).

Valve throat sizes also need to be watched.
The stock 376 LSA comes with a 2.165" intake valve.

One should be sure that the valve throat is at least 87%,
and if the internal volume of the engine is increased, or
if the engine rpm must be increased, the valve throat
will need to be enlarged beyond that value.

Caution should be used here though, as once we move
beyond a 90% throat, we need to evaluate if a sufficient
valve seat width can be maintained for street / strip engines.

On all out engines, when required, we can move to a 92% throat. . .

Cheers
 
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I know it’s not an LSX but with this LSA block I’m going to build, I’m going to try and research and hopefully get insight from you guys (can’t thank you all enough) on all the right parts to throw at the new block so I have something that is reliable but still makes decent power.
Hold your power level to about 750 HP, and you should be okay.
Pay attention to the fuel you use. . . .

Preferably a good oxygenated fuel, such as E85 is best.
 

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I don’t care so much about DYNO numbers but more 1/4 times. So as long as I’m in the very low 10’s or high 9’s I’m happy
They tend to correlate though..lol
 

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Thanks for the clarification, if all goes well, I shouldn't cook another set of main bearings hopefully. Live and learn... PS: the iron block for sure retains more heat, so far my cooling mods are working well.
If heat were really a big problem, then iron blocks would not
be the preferred block, of many NHRA Racers.
 
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Thank you as always duck for the input. The car is generally always ran on e85 or torco e98. As karch points out, the DA here sucks and so does the heat lol.

I’ve been going through research to see what power level people have achieved my desired ET’s at and then trying to plan for the right parts.
 
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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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If heat were really a big problem, then iron blocks would not
be the preferred block, of many NHRA Racers.
That's reassuring news, the noticeable heat increase has mostly just been an observation. I guess I'm still in shell-shock mode from my bad experience a few years ago. I'll rest a little better now. My goal this year is to go on a long distance high performance endurance drive.
 
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