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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for members who have run the lsx, dart, or even an OE iron block.
What oil pump is recommended/required?
Are there any additional cooling upgrades that are required due to the blocks material?
How does the additional weight feel on the front end?
I know @kittyboy runs an LSX B15, how has that worked out for you?
 

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Also interested in this
 

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Suggested:

This is a list for a manual, it is a list focused on the
-B15 long block. Fueling, air, suspension, exhaust, cooling, breaks, tuning, etc. and the rest is a whole other list, but I have added a few extras for consideration to save time later if you have the money.

•2 each water pump gaskets
•1 each rear engine cover gasket
•1 each rear main oil seal
•1 each oil pan gasket
•1 each pick-up tube o-ring and after market two bolt sump tube retainer fitting
•1 each thermostat housing seal
•160* thermostat
•all new AC o-rings and drier bag
•all new belts
•2 each supercharger hx o-rings
•check condition of supercharger gaskets, check condition of supercharger, verify coupler, bearings, service oil
•new plugs and wires
•injectors, if not new and used for a period of time, consider sending them for cleaning and verification to Mr. Injector service.
•check condition of coil packs
•ICT coil brackets and coil pack spacer kit, will also need to fab steel valve cover bracket supports
•replace radiator hoses
•consider oil cooler adaptor and install remote cooler, requires delete block, fittings, hose, etc...
•r&r engine mounts with CS type
•ATI super damper and lower pulley, ARP crank bolt, requires after market idler relocation bracket
•crank pin kit
•r&r oil galley dog bone with after market billet type
•swap the stock -B15 oil pump PN: 12586665 with a Melling M365 or LSA PN: 12612289. The stock -B15 pump aka LS1/LS6 pump is rated up to 6200rpm max, past this, potential cavitation and drop in oil pressure. In my experience pressure begins to drop off at 5600rpm.
•oil pan baffle
•Mcleod HD clutch and bronze pilot bushing
•tilton clutch slave
•make sure to verify the condition of your transmission, Tick Performance has an excellent rebuild program.
•check condition of all bolts and fasteners, replace as necessary, wire brush, solvent clean (holes too) hand fit prior to installing all fasteners, use anti-seize, sealants and thread lockers where applicable, torque everything to oem specs, and torque stripe.

NOTE: The -B15 is a strong, powerful and affordable long block crate engine stock, it has a decent cam and internals, don't defeat the purpose of buying a good value long block completed from the oem if your intent is to tear into it. If that is your goal, you are better off building an engine from scratch. I only suggest the damper, dog bone, and oil pump because it will be a bitch later to change those items with the engine already installed.
•wide band, rpm, oil press, oil temp, coolant temp, fuel press gauges mounted where you can actually see them at high speed
•check lower cradle for cracks at the LCA mounts, look carefully in the machined radius cut areas.
•one piece driveshaft
PS: make sure to prime the oil pump and fill the oil filter prior to the initial engine run.

The truth is, if you want a NASCAR for power and endurance, better off saving your money to purchase one. With the V set a realistic goal and STOP at a reasonable and realistic power level, unless you want to constantly service and replace parts, and can afford to do so. But for damn sure keep an eye on your oil pressure, fuel/air, engine temps at a minimum when first firing it up, follow the oem break-in schedule for both the engine and clutch. Save your first couple oil filters and cut them open for inspection, Blackstone reports for every oil change.

I probably left a few things out, but I hope this helps. Sorry I did not include vendor and part numbers at this time, there are some good vendors here at the site you can hook-up with.
 

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For an 800ish whp build if you were to do it over again kitty , would you go with the lsx b15 or go with something like an ls3 block to save some money?
 

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Copy that. Appreciate the input!
 

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Although I think the B15 is now going for about $9700 from what I’m seeing for a long block
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome post @kittyboy. When you mention:
•r&r oil pump with Melling brand ONLY, stock rated up to 6200rpm max, potential cavitation at higher rpms.
Are you referring to the OE LSA replacement Melling 10355 or a B15 specific pump?
•consider oil cooler adaptor and install remote cooler, requires delete block, fittings, hose, etc...
Does our OE oil cooler not work for the B15?
 

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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I edited my original post to be more clear and included oil pump PNs. The stock -B15 pump is just a little shy of where it should be in my opinion. The Melling M365 or LSA 12612289 would be my preferred choices, but you would most likely be fine with the stock. To answer your question about modifying the oil cooling system, you could use the existing oil cooling setup for sure. I have installed a 1 quart 25 pass with 6" fan, seems to work well, I haven't taken an endurance run yet at higher temperatures, I am waiting for the weather to warm up and haul ass out in the desert for an hour this year soon. The iron block gets hot and retains heat, you definitely will need a higher capacity radiator and tune your fans. I have a high capacity radiator and dual SPAL fans each pulling 1260cfm tuned to run constant at 100%, around town driving or performance driving I average about 165*-190*
 

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I have an iron block in my 79 LSX swap TA. Stroked to 421. 850ish HP, LSA blower etc. It gets hot quick. If I were to do it again, I would have just gone aluminum. The iron was cheap, everyone said you should do it for big HP builds, I honestly don't agree. Too may 1000Hp builds using aluminum with no problems.
 

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LSX block is worth the money. If you wanted to save money and go iron, you could go with a GEN IV 6L truck block. The iron blocks weigh about 100lbs more than aluminum. I don't really notice the difference with the LSX in there as far as weight but it might be noticeable if you are using it on a track with the weight balance. It is just nicer having the iron block as far as durability. My LSA block was cracked in 2 cylinders.

You could buy an LSX block and get it machined for any displacement you want from 4-4.250" and get forged pistons vers, oil pan, heads, front cover. But if you are looking for a stress free drop in, a long block is much easier.

I would not go aluminum for high power. My LSA block with just air raid and 2.5 pulley/tune was quite out of round and cracked. The cylinder walls are not thick enough and if you want to machine it, you don't have many options. You will not have to worry about this with the LSX it is pretty bombproof.
 

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What’re your thoughts on a built LSA block with magnuson 2650? As opposed to going lsx? I have the opportunity to buy a LSA short block that needs a slight refresh and Magnuson 2650. I figure if I sell my running motor, blower, and everything to go with it I can have a fresh built LSA and better blower than what it would cost me for a lsx block alone
 

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Just a short comment:
When we build a better engine, which puts out more HP, that engine will
produce more heat and of course require a larger cooling system. . . .

Also, for Rkkr:
I would not suggest you spend the money for a 2650, to put on a 376 CID Engine.
Roots Style Blowers won't hold that kind of Pressure Ratio.

Cheers
 

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Duck I always appreciate your input and I’m super thankful you chimed in. You believe I can make plenty of power off the stock blower with ported snout ? I’ll be happy (for a while) with 7ish at the wheel
 
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Duck I always appreciate your input and I’m super thankful you chimed in. You believe I can make plenty of power off the stock blower with ported snout ? I’ll be happy (for a while) with 7ish at the wheel
7ish..lol
Yes, doable, but will depend on your mods and fuel available. . .
Might require E85. .

Take a look at Blades1_99 signature line.
It has a lot of info that might be helpful for you.

I believe that Blades / Raymond made a bit more than the 710 rwHP later on using E85, but he can confirm. . [email protected]_99
 
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I typically run the car on torco e85 as it’s mostly a weekend car. Didn’t know if I could keep the blower stock or need to send it out for porting. The new motor will have a cam (2.5 from gp) stock compression and ported heads and probably an 8.6 lower and 2.4 upper
 
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One more bit of info:
At 100% Cylinder Fill, these engines will make about 760 - 780 HP.

After they fill the cylinders with the air required to make that HP, Roots Blowers
tend to give up, become very inefficient, and produce too much heat.

This is where E85 helps out, as it is an oxygenated fuel, which helps to cool the cylinders down.
 
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I typically run the car on torco e85 as it’s mostly a weekend car. Didn’t know if I could keep the blower stock or need to send it out for porting. The new motor will have a cam (2.5 from gp) stock compression and ported heads and probably an 8.6 lower and 2.4 upper
It's all about eliminating the restrictions, one by one from the induction / intake (supply side) side.

Heads and camshaft are the first go-to-places.
Then one typically moves on to porting the blower.

If one desires to make 750 HP, then one must generate that
cfm demand from the engine, via engine rpm and piston speed.

Then one must provide for the appropriate air (induction / supply side).

Generally speaking, multiply your HP Goal by 1.5,
and that will give you the required CFM.

So then. . .
=> (750 - 1.5)= 1125 cfm.

There are also loss factors involved, but we won't go there today..lol

------------------------------------------

Matt at GP Tuning is a good source to use for help, to get you where you want to be. . .
 
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Tons of knowledge and absolutely appreciated as I’d like to spend the money wisely. Buy once cry once
 
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