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Did you bed them in properly?
Scuff them up with some 400 grit sandpaper and see if the pulsation goes away. Could be glazed in spots.
 
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I had the same problem at 10,000 miles. It's "pad transfer" build-up on the rotors.. I tried scuffing them with sand paper. I tried rotary discs, Eventually I brought new GM rotors, and gave the old ones away to a racer. I still have the factory pads.
 

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Try the sandpaper as described as it worked for me and I got another year out of the rotors. with aluminum hats they can't be warped due to the wheel lug nut torque. It has to be pad transfer buildup on the rotors.
 

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Despite what everyone else puts on the V, the original GM rotors and pads are perfect. Serious road racing, like glowing brakes, probably changes something. I have no clue how anyone can tell if the brake system on a V is better with the aftermarket stuff. Unless, of course, someone needs slots and holes for the looks. Absent serious road racing, I have no clue how someone thinks they are getting something better that is driveable on the street.

Pad break-in is critical. Read and follow directions. Make damn sure rotors are clean. I start with easy stops to warm up the rotor and pads. Then gradually brake harder and harder from 60 mph but nowhere near overheat them. Never activate anti-lock during break-in. I put 170,000 miles on my factory V1 set. I never had that particular car on a track however.

I finally gave up on all aftermarket crap.

l had a 90 SHO. I disintegrated the factory brakes. I upgraded to a later model factory brake system. I disintegrated them. I tried so called high performance pads. I disintegrated them. I finally found some pads that seemed to work well on the track when they got hot, but would not stop on the street. Of course then I started screwing up rotors. From my perspective it is hopeless.

I had the same problem with clutches on that car. Finally had a dual clutch custom made that worked, but it took four tries. Then I had to upgrade the slave cylinder. But at least the clutch worked on the track after that.

I will post aftermarket pads and rotors as a question. How does one figure that crap out on a V?. All hype, no facts from my perspective.

Man, this post wound me up this morning. I need to go clean out the latrine or something.
 

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I've got 345s on the back and 285s up front. I've flogged my car on the track a few times, OEM brakes and pads, they still work great.

Given the weight of the car, the tires are more likely to be the limiting factor on stopping power, not the brakes. The car definitely stops harder with fatter tires. But every once in a while I still get ABS kicking in, which is why I think the tires are still the limiting factor and upgrading the brakes will only get me in to ABS sooner.
 

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Did you torque the wheels? Endless GM service bulletins going back into the 80s specifically detail the importance of wheel torque. Torque sticks are not equal to a accurate torque wrench. The larger the wheel, the larger the rotor, the more critical it becomes. I've had brand new vehicles (2014 Regal GS, 2017 Yukon XL, 2021 Yukon XL) with perfect brakes until my first GM tire rotation, every time, the dealer hammered the wheels on. I've usually had to pull each rotor and cut it, then correctly torque the wheel.

If you put a brand new rotor on a brake lathe, you'll quickly realize how terrible the quality control is, and an un-torqued wheel exacerbates that issue.
 
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