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Discussion Starter #1
Putting on new yellow Brembos soon. One of the front ones came with a slightly squished crossover, settled for a partial refudn and bent up a new crossover with the correct bubble flare and fittings.

So for installing new calipers, I've seen some reference to pre-filling them before hooking up the banjo line.. is this recommended rather than just putting them on empty? I just foresee a bunch of brake fluid spilling everywhere, so I'm not sure what the benefits or prefilling them is. Any thoughts?
 

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If you can, I would.

The real issue is if the ABS module loses fluid. If that happens, you need a Tech2 or other device to trigger the ABS so it can fill.

@Larry Arizona


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Discussion Starter #3
That part I get, the plan is to install each caliper in the bleed order, and bleed each as i go. The lines will stay connected to the old calipers right up until it's time to swap them, to minimize the fluid draining out. Then bleed the whole thing again once they're all on, for good measure.

Or does prefilling let me get away with doing all 4 calipers before doing the bleeding?
 

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I would prefill with clean fluid before if you can. I’m not sure how easily it’s done, I haven’t tried it, but if you can control the mess why not?

Otherwise, it’s just more time.


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That part I get, the plan is to install each caliper in the bleed order, and bleed each as i go. The lines will stay connected to the old calipers right up until it's time to swap them, to minimize the fluid draining out. Then bleed the whole thing again once they're all on, for good measure.

Or does prefilling let me get away with doing all 4 calipers before doing the bleeding?
I took my whole system apart and painted the calipers and installed SS lines. You will be fine replacing the calipers then going back and doing the bleeding after words, you just dont want the system sitting open for days at a time for a couple reasons. 1, it will allow drain back to the ABS module as Karch mentioned (bad,bad PITA) and 2, you allow moisture into the system by having it open (for days/weeks). Just swapping calipers in a day or so is no problem. Not sure if you have a compressor, if so there is a cheap bleed kit you can put together that makes bleeding painless and thorough. I personally suggest follow the serive manual to bleed all four. It starts with just the inner bleeders on each wheel (cant recall the sequence but there is one) then to outers. I had pedal immediately after the 1st complete bleed... Then went back and redid the sequence again because it didnt take long with the bleed kit hooked up. If you go that way, you only use low psi (6-10??) and keep checking the reservoir so you dont push air in.. I put my calipers on dry and like I said it was no problem, but i was not pedal bleeding.. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Right on, thanks for the help.
I plan to get it done on the same day, all 4 corners up on jackstands.
Bleed order as per alldatadiy is RR, LF, LR, RF, inner bleeder first then outer. It's a solo job so I'll be using a vacuum bleeder.
 

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Just don’t let your reservoir run dry and you should be ok.


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I didn't let my reservoir run dry, and even with a Motive power bleeder, had a difficult time getting all the air out. The system was open only for however long it took me to swap the lines and calipers. It still took me what seemed like 4X ~ 5X capacity to get most of the bubbles out... and I still had the occasional champaign bubble. Took it to the dealer, where another flush was done just to be safe. By then, they said they saw very little air left.

If your caliper is pretty much empty (as mine was) of brake fluid, be prepared for a potential marathon. Prefill if you can. Also, fluid will get all over the calipers... be careful, especially if you have refinished calipers. I had mine painted after the brake job was completed.
 

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For the record, even if you don’t get a perfect bleed, the system will eventually self bleed.

I had issues bleeding mine after caliper powder coating. Eventually got what I called a 90% pedal.

Two weeks later it was 100% just from driving it


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Discussion Starter #11
Follow up, did the install last weekend and wow those yellow bananas look great.

I did not prefill the calipers, glad I didn't because I could not picture avoiding spilling brake fluid all over the place. Removing the old crush washers from each caliper was messy, they had formed around the threads of the banjo and had to be unscrewed with pliers, while the hose continued to drip on my hands.

I installed each caliper at a time, according the bleed order (RR,LF,LR,RF), and gravity bled after each was installed to fill them up. Kept a close eye on the reservoir level the whole time. For the final overall bleed, the vacuum bleeder was drawing air through the threads so I tossed it aside and called my gf out to help with the pedal method. The gravity bleeding as I went did an almost perfect job; pedal bleeding did not show any more air bubbles coming out, so it was more so to flush all the old stuff out.

Went out for a quick break-in drive, and the brakes continue to improve from dailying it.
 

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For anyone reading this, if you get air in your ABS. One of the owners of Motive Bleeders has a V and we figured out how to get air out of that ABS without a Tech 2.

Years ago I lost a rear brake line on my old V1 which has this newer style, tricky to bleed, GM ABS system. I drove it another 30 miles home and pretty much drained the entire system on the way, not knowing what I was in for when I went to bleed it myself. Anyway, pump your Motive Bleeder up to about 12-14PSI and cycle the key on and off, waiting for the majority of the dash lights to go out. When you turn the key on the ABS pump does a sequence of valve opening and closing that will let the motive push fluid in. This was how I did it. And I did with the system closed and later open at a rear caliper. But I was able to get it done myself at home. How many times do you need to cycle the key to get all the air out? I have no idea. I bet I did it 40-50 times.

Even with a Tech 2 some can't get it bled right. You should have seen all the complaints on LS1Tech when GM did the brake hose recall on the V1s. LOL
 
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