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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Huge amount of frustration attempting to extract my pilot bearing, standard LS bearing, I swear it will not budge, failed attempts caused not a scratch or damage, it's indestructible and impossible to remove. Anyone use a pilot bearing removal tool that actually works?
 

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An old mechanic's trick is to use something to push it out. I have used modeling clay and a rod the size of the inner hole. Fill the hole with clay making sure to get it in behind the bearing, leave a little room for the rod to fit in the hole about half way and then a few hits on the end of the rod with a hammer. basically, you're using hydraulic pressure to push it out.
 

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An old mechanic's trick is to use something to push it out. I have used modeling clay and a rod the size of the inner hole. Fill the hole with clay making sure to get it in behind the bearing, leave a little room for the rod to fit in the hole about half way and then a few hits on the end of the rod with a hammer. basically, you're using hydraulic pressure to push it out.
Thank you for the suggestion, my concern is that the crank has a pressed plug behind the pilot bearing, I want to be careful not to damage it.
 

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Yeah don't do the bread trick. I actually did it on mine and realized the oil plug in the crank got pushed in pretty far. It did work through! but at that point my engine was built and if I did dislodge that plug it would have been a lot of work. If you have the crank out and a replacement plug could do
 

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You can rent or buy a slide hammer (basically a long rod where you can attach various hooks on the end), and yank it out that way. Most of the auto box stores have one you can borrow.

It's just a matter of finding the right attachment to fit inside the bearing - I bought a slide hammer and had to modify one of the hooks for it to fit the bearing ID.

You could probably make one from a hardened bolt and washer, grinding a hook on the threaded end to fit the inside of the bearing and then slowly pry it out (levering against the block and the bolt head/washer) if no tool is available


Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk
 

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2011 CTSV Coupe M BLK LSX376-B15
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I tried a couple similar adjustable hoop variations, the U shape type and the hammer type as illustrated. Guess I did not mod the hook well enough, they slid out every time, I would feel extraction force for a moment but then the hooks would slide out? One of my concerns using the hammer slide type is a chance I might cause some internal engine damage, not sure? Does anyone have a close-up picture of hook shape that worked really well? ty
 

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What if you use the hydraulic method (I used wet strips of paper on a different crank once) but use a piece of metal to close off the crank oil plug? Like a dime for ex?

Also, harbor freight sells bearing pullers that get far better engagement than a two pronged slide hammer attachment. I used one of those along with some threaded Rod to do blower case bearings, and probably the pilot come to think of it. With threaded Rod, hardened hardware, and some plate steel welded in a U, you’ve got a puller you can run with an impact

Ps the slide hammer has never been used. Match thread with some Rod and build tool.


 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What if you use the hydraulic method (I used wet strips of paper on a different crank once) but use a piece of metal to close off the crank oil plug? Like a dime for ex?

Also, harbor freight sells bearing pullers that get far better engagement than a two pronged slide hammer attachment. I used one of those along with some threaded Rod to do blower case bearings, and probably the pilot come to think of it. With threaded Rod, hardened hardware, and some plate steel welded in a U, you’ve got a puller you can run with an impact

Ps the slide hammer has never been used. Match thread with some Rod and build tool.


That one your holding with four splits, have you used it for a pilot bearing?
 

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That one your holding with four splits, have you used it for a pilot bearing?
Yes. It’s all coming back to me now.

I got my short block back from the machine shop and was like ‘why in tf did I not have them do this?’

I rented a pilot bearing tool but it didn’t work.

So I used the puller I already had from the blower work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Question to engine builders? Can a slide hammer type pilot bearing/bushing extractor potentially cause any damage to the engine internals due to impact? ty
 

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That's why you have a thrust washer bearing. It will be OK.
Yeah, I don't think your right hand will matter much to a crank that spins 8 hammers at 7k RPM making 800 ft-lbs of torque.

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thought to share, I just purchased a spring loaded, self adjusting bearing puller, I only have the head, (see attached image). The slide hammer is on back order. The Pilot is between 15-17mm, 15mm=.59" Works on bearings up to 0.70" thickness. This tool is primarily used for production, but what the hell...
Automotive lighting Drinkware Material property Font Bicycle part
 

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Huge amount of frustration attempting to extract my pilot bearing, standard LS bearing, I swear it will not budge, failed attempts caused not a scratch or damage, it's indestructible and impossible to remove. Anyone use a pilot bearing removal tool that actually works?
Just for curiosity, why are you removing the pilot bearing?
 

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An old mechanic's trick is to use something to push it out. I have used modeling clay and a rod the size of the inner hole. Fill the hole with clay making sure to get it in behind the bearing, leave a little room for the rod to fit in the hole about half way and then a few hits on the end of the rod with a hammer. basically, you're using hydraulic pressure to push it out.
Believe it or not bread is also one of those tricks... and I used it.. lol
 

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No, it's it's in perfect condition,
For whatever it is worth. . .

Pilot Bearings / Bushings typically do not wear out.
Usually best to leave them alone, as you can damage things when attempting to replace them.
 
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