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Simply use the Radar Detector as a switch, to energize a Taser, located just below your ass.

Should make your ass vibrate real good…😱
 

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Except the schematic is labeled "in" and "out" not "left" and "right" or "one" and "two". Which is why I supposed they're switching both legs. Either way, though, I think the best approach is a dedicated motor. Tying in to GM electrical systems can be tricky, at least in my experience. Going back to when I tried to hook up the backlights of a gauge set on my 02 Z06 to the dashlight circuit, and I discovered for some reason the dimmer circuit switched the low leg to ground, not the high leg to V+. The dash got dim when the gauges got bright, and vice-a-versa. I had to make a little FET inverter circuit to drive my gauges. Never assumed GM engineers made sensible decisions since then.
 

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Except the schematic is labeled "in" and "out" not "left" and "right" or "one" and "two". Which is why I supposed they're switching both legs. Either way, though, I think the best approach is a dedicated motor. Tying in to GM electrical systems can be tricky, at least in my experience. Going back to when I tried to hook up the backlights of a gauge set on my 02 Z06 to the dashlight circuit, and I discovered for some reason the dimmer circuit switched the low leg to ground, not the high leg to V+. The dash got dim when the gauges got bright, and vice-a-versa. I had to make a little FET inverter circuit to drive my gauges. Never assumed GM engineers made sensible decisions since then.
once you get left to right, in to out, or any other configurations to work, please let me know how that taser works for you..lol

I would suggest that you begin on the highest taser setting possible, to be sure your booty shakes sufficiently, when the radar detector is activated.😂

Please be sure are you report back to this forum how much your booty did shake.😃
 
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Except the schematic is labeled "in" and "out" not "left" and "right" or "one" and "two". Which is why I supposed they're switching both legs. Either way, though, I think the best approach is a dedicated motor. Tying in to GM electrical systems can be tricky, at least in my experience. Going back to when I tried to hook up the backlights of a gauge set on my 02 Z06 to the dashlight circuit, and I discovered for some reason the dimmer circuit switched the low leg to ground, not the high leg to V+. The dash got dim when the gauges got bright, and vice-a-versa. I had to make a little FET inverter circuit to drive my gauges. Never assumed GM engineers made sensible decisions since then.
The schematic is actually labeled LR and RR so I am confident it is the hot leg of each motor. It just needs to vibrate not change directions like a seat motor would. In any case I have decided against using those wires as I dont feel smart enough to incorporate a diode (I think thats what I would need?) and I dont want to deal with BCM short to voltage DTCs. I dont have a tool that will read/clear those codes, only OBDII. At some point it would be cool to make it plug and play with the existing seat motors. I ordered the relay module and a haptic seat motor from Amazon and plan to tinker with it this weekend. I guess my plan would be to attach the motor to the bottom of the seat if it vibrates enough, or incorporate it in the foam similar to the existing motors.

Cars are indeed more complicated than back in the day. I've hardwired either a radar, dashcam or an FM modulator in every car I've owned. It used to be easy as hell to grab a switched 12v source in the fuse box but these days every damn thing is supplying constant 12v to a module which then decides whether to give power to the window/seat/whatever based on a serial data connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Automotive tire Sports equipment Wire Electrical wiring Bicycle handlebar

Here is the guts of the smart cord control box. The "5th" wire is one of the power wires coming from the fuse box so I already know its gets 12V whenever the car is on or has RAP before I open the door after shut down. I probed the wires with a ground to chassis. I was not able to make the detector fire off a real alert, but if you get the smart cord in the right position in the detector, it lights up both LEDs. The blue LED is always on when the detector is powered up, and the orange lights up on alerts. I have a HF meter so the super low mV could be noise:

1. Detector (RD) on: 47.7mv, Alert 0v, RD unplugged (car on) 0
2. RD on: .303v, Alert 2.07v, unplugged 12v
3. RD on 12v, Alert 12v, unplugged 12v
4. RD on 3.2v, Alert 8v, unplugged 0

alerted the part that confuses me. Both LEDs get about 2V when theyre lit, nothing when they arent, and show 12v when the detector is unplugged but dont light up. Also, I started testing resistance between chassis and the wires and they were all over the place except wire 1 which was 297kohms when on, and 7.7ohms when alterted. I'm no EE... anyone have any insight? This is what I ordered and sounds like in low mode it will fire on 1.5v. Not sure about high. The front of the seat comes apart easy and there shouldnt be a problem getting the haptic motor in there.

Amazon.com: HiLetgo 12V 1 Channel Relay Module With Optocoupler Isolation Support High or Low Level Trigger : Industrial & Scientific
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Also I found this:

 

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The reason why you get 12 volts on the LED when OFF and 2.7 when ON is the circuit opens the GROUND path to the LED.

Connect the negative lead from whatever you are using to trigger (solid state relay) to the point that goes to ZERO (#1) and the POSITIVE of the trigger to #3 (maybe #4)

Most of these cars switch GROUND and not POWER in the mirror circuitry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The reason why you get 12 volts on the LED when OFF and 2.7 when ON is the circuit opens the GROUND path to the LED.

Connect the negative lead from whatever you are using to trigger (solid state relay) to the point that goes to ZERO (#1) and the POSITIVE of the trigger to #3 (maybe #4)

Most of these cars switch GROUND and not POWER in the mirror circuitry.
Thanks for the insight. I grounded the meter on 1. #3 was 12v anytime the RD was on, alert or not. #4 was 3v when the RD is on, 7v on an alert. So I guess I need a relay to trigger on more than 3 but less than 7ish volts? The relay I ordered has a hi and lo setting. The low triggers on 1.2-1.5 according to the reviews but I’m not sure on the high setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I would use a potentiometer and "dial it in" if I needed to.
Use the "high" range setting on the trigger and your should be good to go.
So I got everything hooked up with jumpers to test and the relay runs the haptic motor no problem but unfortunately even in high mode the 3v triggers it all the time. I have an assortment of pots and resisters on the way. Any idea which pot I should try first?
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Got it all figured out. I tried a 100K pot and the relay pretty much triggered at 1.2V on hi limit setting. So with the RD on, I used to pot to dial back the 3v idle voltage until it got just under 1.2V. This way the relay only triggers on an alert.

Looking at my picture above, I tapped into the yellow wire for the alert. This sits at 3v during normal operation and spikes to 8v on an alert to trigger the transistor to ground the alert LED. I was able to do this down the line with a t-tap so I did not have to solder on the small control board. I wanted to remove the seat but it was really cumbersome and my back wasnt liking it, so I just removed the rear bolts and unlatched the front so I could slide the whole assembly forward. The seat bolts were large (T-50?) and had blue locktite so they were kind of a bear to break lose. I did add more blue thread locker when replacing. The negative battery terminal was removed before disconnecting the main seat harness as it has SRS components in it, but in hindsight, since I was not removing the seat I could have left that connector intact and just removed the negative battery terminal.

To remove the seat cover, I had to remove the front seat panel which was just held in with clips, and the outboard seat panel, held in place by T-20 bolts front and rear. There is a connector for the seat controls, and after that is gone, the seat cover is held in place by a metal bar also with two T-20 bolts. This is the only part that would be very hard to do with the seat not moved forward off its mounting point. Once the bar is gone the cover is held by j clips on the side and front. I was able to peel back the cover maybe 1/3 to 1/2 way. The foam in the side bolster was torn and dry rotted, so I added some foam I had laying around as it was hard to not tear it more when replacing the cover. It seems the adjustable bolsters are not kind to the foam. I am not so sure the cover is supposed to be separated from the foam, as there are clips that tear away from the foam when doing this. It is also held down in channels with velcro. I used my fingers to tear out a cavity for the motor a little forward of the existing haptic motor and stuffed it in there.

I ran the leads down the front of the seat and under the carpet to the edge of the car then up under the dash. I've never seen car carpet with so much padding. I am guessing this is cut down on noise. It also explains why it is so tough to get good exhaust sound out of these cars I think. Moving the seat back off its mounting points was also required to hide the wire under the carpet. I tried several different fishing techniques with the seat bolted in and no dice. The insulation further complicated things.

It was very tricky to get the seat cover back on properly. Just stretching it over the bolster pulls foam down with it and you end up with a weird looking seat with hard spots. I had to keep making sure to keep the bolster tucked in as I pulled the cover over. After that I replaced the seat trim, bolted the seat back down, cleaned up the motor wires a bit, and reinstalled the rocker panel trim where the carpet meets the car body. Wiring everything up wasnt bad, I did it all under the kick panel above the pedals. Right now the relay and pot are just a mess of wires insulated with electrical tape, but I will have a small enclosure for the set up installed soon. I pulled off of the power wire for the RD, so it is fused with a 5 amp fuse which I think will be plenty sufficient, but I considered ordering another tap to take power from another branch. The relay itself only pulls a few mA and the motor cant pull very much either. This is pulled off of the wireless charger fuse location, as this is one of the few circuits with switched power. It wouldnt kill me if it blew since I dont really use that cubby hole for charging.

I would also like to use resistors instead of an adjustable pot but I am not good enough with electrical theory to figure that one out, so I will likely leave the pot, and secure it either to my enclosure or the kick panel. This would also allow for a disconnect for the motor since turning the pot all the way down will stop the relay from being triggered no matter what. The seat harness is right at the front under the seat so it would be cool to tap into the existing haptic motor with a diode to prevent confusing the seat module, but I am too scared to do that without a scan tool that can clear those DTCs.

If anyone wants part numbers or has more questions let me know. I am not sure how different this would be on the non Recaro seats but would guess without the adjustable seat bolsters it may be easier.
 

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If you want to use resistors, you just need to measure the resistance from the wiper to the other terminals and then get two resistors and duplicate (close as you can) the two values.

You could also use a zener diode to drop the voltage to a range you can use.

Put it in series with a resistor (current limit).

I would use a 6.3 volt zener and a 1k resistor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Well screw me... The trigger wire gave off 8v when I wiggled the cord to make all the lights go off, but on alert during regular use it does not rise above 3. I drove it around and got some K band alerts and nothing. Ugh. I can make the detector go off for laser with my phone but it take a min to get it to work.

I ended up opening the box back up, soldering a wire to the + side of the LED. Now I have 2ish volts on alert, no voltage on idle, BUT on start up it gets 12v and also gets 12v if I unplug the RD while the car is on. Not sure what I am going to do, besides wire a switch to the trigger wire to control it. Its pretty annoying. The motor vibrates for 2-3 seconds on start up, and also if I disconnect the RD when stowing it, if I do so before opening the door to cut off RAP.

I wonder if there is a switched circuit that does not get RAP? If so I could power the relay with that, this way it wouldnt work no matter what comes thru the trigger wire.
 

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Well screw me... The trigger wire gave off 8v when I wiggled the cord to make all the lights go off, but on alert during regular use it does not rise above 3. I drove it around and got some K band alerts and nothing. Ugh. I can make the detector go off for laser with my phone but it take a min to get it to work.

I ended up opening the box back up, soldering a wire to the + side of the LED. Now I have 2ish volts on alert, no voltage on idle, BUT on start up it gets 12v and also gets 12v if I unplug the RD while the car is on. Not sure what I am going to do, besides wire a switch to the trigger wire to control it. Its pretty annoying. The motor vibrates for 2-3 seconds on start up, and also if I disconnect the RD when stowing it, if I do so before opening the door to cut off RAP.

I wonder if there is a switched circuit that does not get RAP? If so I could power the relay with that, this way it wouldnt work no matter what comes thru the trigger wire.
As I said, these switch the ground, not the positive.

Use the negative side of the led for your negative connection to the relay.

Use #4 for the positive connection on your relay.

You could also try the positive lead from the LED as well.

In fact, you might just try connecting your solid state relay across the LED, it might have enough voltage to trigger the relay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I’ll try that. The relay power supply needs to have common ground with the trigger. So I’m guessing both grounds goto negative LED, positive trigger to #4, positive relay supply to 12v accessory power?
 

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I’ll try that. The relay power supply needs to have common ground with the trigger. So I’m guessing both grounds goto negative LED, positive trigger to #4, positive relay supply to 12v accessory power?
NO NO NO!

The input does not have to share a ground with the power supply.

Treat the input circuitry separate from the output circuitry.

TRUST ME.

If you are using a solid state relay, the above applies.

You just use the voltage across the LED to trigger the relay input (it should be enough).

The relay output is your switch, one side to 12v positive, the other to a motor lead the other motor lead to ground.

If you wire both "grounds" of the relay together and go across the LED, when the LED lights you will smoke the current limiting resistor for the LED.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I think we are confusing each other. Go look at the Amazon listing. The relay itself needs 12v supply to function, completely separate from the 12v being switched to the motor. I believe according to the specs, the trigger and supply ground need to be common.
 

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Then you are not using a solid state relay.
Handwriting Font Parallel Rectangle Drawing




Ideally I would use one lead of the LED (anode) for the positive to the trigger. This will probably be positive all the time with respect to ground.

As for negative. Trace the other lead off the LED and see where it goes. It will probably go to one end of a resistor. Note, one lead off the LED is gonna go to a resistor!

The other end of the resistor is where to connect the other end of the trigger, negative, this IS NOT in respect to ground. This gets switched to ground when activated/alarm.

One thing you mention that on startup, it triggers.

This is because some units on start up default to a known state or LED test where all the LEDS light up/flash on turn on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Thanks that worked like a charm. I soldered leads to each side of alert led on back of the circuit board. Here is a rough sketch of my relay and how I did it. This relay needs a 12v supply to function. I was not sure sub 2v would fire the 3vdc relay. This only gives the motor 12v when the alert LED fires, not when the RD is unhooked or any other time. I got rid of the potentiometer too.
Font Rectangle Circuit component Electric blue Audio equipment
 
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