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Im not sure if everyone caught the news over the weekend, A bus in northerner Saskatchewan was in an accident with a semi carrying a full load on a major hyway. The accident was very horrific because the bus and the semi were traveling in different directions and is sadly took the lives of 15 people, most of them being players of the Humboldt Broncos team between the age of 16-21. The bus driver and 2 or 3 coaches were also killed but most of the team was lost in this terrible accident. My family wasn't directly impacted but being from Alberta and many of those kids were from cut from the same cloth as most of the prairie provinces its resonating loudly in Canada and the rest of the world.

I never played hockey but I was involved in many other sports and had many long trips in buses while I attended school and collage and cant begin to imagine the difficult journey the families, team mates, Humboldt Broncos organization and everyone else effect in this loss will have to experience. I dont feel its necessary to post pictures of the wreck, there has not been an explanation though one can be made pretty quickly based on the roads the vehicles were traveling but the point of this post wasn't to discuss that I just wanted to share a go fund me link for those that might want to help in a monetary way.

https://www.gofundme.com/funds-for-humboldt-broncos

There has already been a massive out pour of support but it never hurts to share ways to help these families and community move forward.
 

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I never played hockey.....
Don't you lose Canadian Citizenship for that? Or punishable by death??!??!

On a serious note, the LA Kings held a 50/50 raffle at their last regular season game on April 7th. There was so much support, tickets were still being printed after the game had ended.

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=la kings

LA Kings
30 mins ·

Due to the overwhelming support of the 50/50 Raffle on Saturday night benefiting the Humboldt Broncos, tickets were still printing after the game ended.

The winning ticket is: R-471256

If you are the winner, please contact the Kings Care Foundation at [email protected]!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't you lose Canadian Citizenship for that? Or punishable by death??!??!

On a serious note, the LA Kings held a 50/50 raffle at their last regular season game on April 7th. There was so much support, tickets were still being printed after the game had ended.

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=la kings
You are probably right, but the truth is its an expensive sport, we were looking into it for our son and we have been told its about 800$ for registration alone per year when they are 5 plus gear and those fees just climb every year. We will probably put our son into if he wants to play but no chance my family could afford that when I was a kid hehe.

The support from all off the NHL and even other sports has been incredible, I think most teams were donating like this and the Winnipeg jets raised 320,000$ and half of that was donated as well. Its nice to see people from all walks of life helping out where they can.
 

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Both my boys played travel hockey from the time they were 6 or 7 all the way up through high school at the varsity level.

Travel hockey was minimally $3K a year. Doesn’t include equipment and incidentals, and both my boys were goalies.

High school was a little less expensive but not by much.

They never played at the AAA level which is even more expensive.

Even though it was expensive, I don’t regret spending one dime. Great lessons for them, great memories and met some wonderful people.

I miss watching my boys play.

As for this tragedy, it is truly sad. My heart goes out to the team and the families. The outpouring you’ve seen throughout the hockey community, from youth levels to the NHL, reinforces what I believe that hockey people are generally pretty special.

I think it comes from the importance of teamwork and the fact that most people who have played are pretty down to earth.


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This truly was devastating. I stuck a hockey stick on my porch Tuesday night. The very fabric of life that hockey holds in every Canadian's life, especially in small towns (5600 in Humboldt) is so strong. That community is in such a funk right now I can't imagine.

My son played travel hockey for years, and though we didn't bus to places we all know and share with our Canadian friends.
 

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Very sad all around and my prayers are with all hurt and departed. Hate seeing shit like this.... FYI I just hung up the blades in Jan of this year after 50 years, it is one of the few sports you can play until you die. My knees are shot and I miss it even though i was down to one day a week.

Has there been a reason for the crash?
 

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No one seems to be saying. I did hear one commentator mention "how can the truck driver live with himself"? That is the only think I have heard, and obviously that tells us who may have caused the problem. Still, I have not confirmed anything on the accident.

 

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Holy shit, what a bitch. And it was written by a Canadian. She has her own set of issues, that is for sure.
 

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9 million Canadian already raised, so what will they do with the $53 USD? Sorry had too.....

That is awful and the pic just posted is pretty horrific. What the heck even happened? Looks like an open parking lot with no lines....RIP to those that lost their lives!
 

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RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) have parked each and every truck owned by the trucking line that may have run a stop sign directly into the bus. I say may because I have read nothing definitive about who caused the accident, and I read everything I can about it. I get a daily feed from CBC and TNN on hockey, both are Canadian news feeds.
 

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From an article I just read about another young lady, age 24, who just died and was their athletic trainer.

The team was on its way to a playoff game Friday when the bus collided with a semi-trailer at an intersection near Tisdale, Saskatchewan. Thirteen people were injured.

Police say the uninjured truck driver was initially detained but later released and provided with mental health assistance.

The owner of the company whose truck was involved said Wednesday that he is sorry. "I'm just sorry for everything," Sukhmander Singh said.

Alberta Transportation said Tuesday it had ordered the company, Adesh Deol Trucking Ltd., to keep its only other truck off the road. The move is standard when a transportation company has been involved in a serious accident, the province said.

Transportation Minister Brian Mason said the company started operating last fall and had not had any violations or convictions. He said it had not been involved in any collisions before Friday.

Saskatchewan Royal Canadian Mounted Police said Wednesday that officers were still investigating the accident. They said they have done dozens of interviews and vehicle computer data is being recovered and analyzed. Traffic reconstruction specialists were also working on the investigation.
 

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Jeez. What a tragic loss of life for what appears to be either an impaired or distracted driver.

Cell phone, fatigue or under the influence?

RIP.

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I have read that the semi blew a stop sign.
I was waiting for the final report before I mentioned that there is a flashing red light at the stop sign as well. This mf is going to have to live with his mistake for the rest of his life.
 

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Injured Humboldt Broncos player says he's going to live big 'for the guys who didn't make it'

'It can all change in an instant,' 20-year-old Kaleb Dahlgren says




A slogan on a T-shirt Kaleb Dahlgren got from the NHL's L.A. Kings sums up how he plans to recover from injuries he suffered in the tragic Humboldt Broncos bus crash that left 16 people dead: "Enjoy the Grind."

"That really spoke volumes to me because a lot of people can wake up in the morning and be negative: 'Work sucks. Why am I up so early?' Everyone's got their own things to complain about, but you just gotta enjoy the grind and be grateful you're here and thankful for all that you've got," Dahlgren, a 20-year-old forward and assistant captain, said from his home in Saskatoon.

"It can all change in an instant."

The collision between the Broncos bus and a semi-trailer took place April 6 around 5 p.m. on Highway 35, about 30 kilometres from Tisdale, in northeastern Saskatchewan.


The Broncos were travelling to Nipawin from the team's hometown of Humboldt for the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL) semifinal series against the Nipawin Hawks.

Woke up 4 days later
Dahlgren doesn't remember the crash that left 16 players and team staff members dead and 13 injured, including himself.

He had just changed into his suit and put on his headphones.

He woke up four days later, confused, with fractures and a puncture wound in his skull, a brain injury, two broken vertebrae in his neck, three others that were fractured or cracked, and four broken vertebrae in his back.

Wondering if he'd been checked from behind. Wondering who won the game.

"With his type of brain injury, only three to five per cent of people recover from that," his father, Mark Dahlgren, told CBC News. "There was lots of neurological cognitive testing done, and they couldn't find any deficits, and so that in itself is miraculous."

Parents spent time at the scene
Dahlgren's parents, both nurses, spent time at the scene of the crash that day. They endured nearly five torturous hours of not knowing if he'd survived.

"We thought that nobody had made it. We didn't see any survivors. So we were just trying to come to terms with the fact that nobody survived," Mark Dahlgren said.

They had to tell their son about the tragedy twice.

"We found out a few days after ... he didn't remember everything we told him and he wasn't sure how he got the injury," his father said.

"He had the same reaction, 'Just wake me up, I'm dreaming,' And then he said, 'I need to live big, I need to live for the guys that didn't make it.'"

'I'm happy he's still here'
Within days, Kaleb Dahlgren had convinced the medical staff in charge of this rehabilitation to let him do some light workouts — the familiarity and routine was a comfort.

Dahlgren shared a hospital room with some of his teammates and says that helped the healing process — not just physically but mentally and emotionally as well.

'Something we could do to give back': Brother of injured Broncos player organizing charity hockey tournament
The hardest part, so far, said Dahlgren, was not being able to attend any of the 16 funerals. He was too injured to leave the hospital.


It's just crazy how some things can change in the blink of an eye'



Dahlgren reflects on his love for his team and teammates. 0:40
His father said that, for him, the toughest part has been grappling with the the fact that people lost their sons and his survived.

"And you know, there's the guilt that comes with that."

He said he's stopped asking "why" and "what if."

"It was the worst day of my life and the best day of my life — all within four hours," he said. "Every day, I tell Kaleb I'm happy he's still here, that I love him."

While it's not easy to see his son so severely injured, Mark Dahlgren says he has no anger toward the driver of the semi-trailer.

"I can't imagine what he's going through. And I wish we could support him, too, because he's a victim in all this, too. And, you know, accidents happen, and the chances of both those vehicles being in that intersection at the same time are astronomical. … I just really feel for him and his family."

Physiotherapy 3 times a week
Dahlgren was discharged from hospital on Apr. 27. The top item on his to-do list was to visit Humboldt.


Dahlgren said he was astounded but not surprised by the memorials for victims of the crash. (Susan Ormiston/CBC)
He visited the Grade 5 students he volunteered with, a special friend in the care home and some of the men with disabilities that he used to drive to and from the rink for every game. He was astounded by the memorials around town.

Dahlgren says the outpouring of support has made a world of difference.


He said it was hard to return to the rink, and to see the messages written on his teammates' stalls in the team's locker room.

Now, he's trying to settle into a routine. Three times a week, he gets physiotherapy and he's starting to work out, a look of determination and concentration on his face.

University plans deferred
A big part of his recovery involves rest, fresh air and "brain food" — he's a regular at Thrive Juice Company, picking up a shopping bag full of Royal Flush, made of kale, spinach, celery, cucumber, apple, lime and ginger.

"It's enough greens for the whole day," he said with a grin, chugging the dark green liquid.

Broncos' tribute concert shows families 'we're not in this alone,' says grieving father
At nearly 21, this was Dahlgren's last season with the Broncos. Shortly before the crash, he was sorting through hockey scholarship offers at a handful of universities and looking forward to a bright future in either business or education.

Those plans are on hold now. Most of the universities have deferred their offers for a year so he can concentrate on healing — and giving back to the community that means so much to him.


Before the crash, Dahlgren was already an ambassador for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. (Don Somers, CBC News)
Dahlgren hopes he can still play a small role with the Broncos, perhaps as a scout.

'I want to be a difference maker'
Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age four, he's an ambassador for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. He also created a project called Dahlgren's Diabeauties, which offers kids with Type 1 diabetes a little hockey limelight. At each home game throughout the Broncos' season, a child with the condition gets to wear a special jersey for the game and participate in the puck drop.

"I want to be a difference maker and be a positive person about it, because I know up there [in heaven] that's what they'd want me to be," he said.

Dahlgren describes his extensive volunteer work in Humboldt.


Dahlgren pulled out a notebook with pages of handwritten names to whom he wanted to say thank you: to the first responders and medical staff; the companies that are supporting the Broncos and the families; the NHL and the hockey world; the music industry; and those around the world who sent messages of support and contributed to an online fundraising campaign.

"I've just been bombarded with all the love, and I'm really grateful for that," he said.

'I'll live the rest of my life for them'
Dahlgren knows there will be tough days ahead.

He doesn't know why he survived when others around him didn't. But he knows he's been given a second chance at life.

Saskatchewan to hire consulting firm to assess Broncos crash intersection
"Maybe it wasn't my time to go. I think it's just the luck of the draw, though, because it wasn't anyone else's time to go," he said.

"I miss them. I love them very much. And I'll live the rest of my life for them."
 

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Injured Bronco Ryan Straschnitzki is grateful, determined and sometimes angry

After crash that killed many of his teammates, he's working to literally get back on his feet

Bill Graveland · The Canadian Press · Posted: May 21, 2018 8:34 AM MT | Last Updated: May 21

Ryan Straschnitzki is involved in the toughest game of his life.

Seven weeks after being paralyzed from the chest down when a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team crashed, he has embarked on the thing a lot of athletes dread — two-a-day workouts.

It was his choice to undertake twice daily physiotherapy sessions at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary.

"It's tough, but it's worth it for sure," said Straschnitzki in an interview with The Canadian Press from his hospital bed. "I'm better. Physio's getting better. I'm feeling a lot better. Everything's healing perfectly — I've still got some soreness and what not."

Recently he was learning to move himself from his wheelchair to a bed during physio with the use of a slide board. It took a long time.

He also worked at turning over on his side. That involved locking his hands together and rocking back and forth. He finally achieved it, but there was a look of pain on his face and he immediately grabbed his shoulder.

Grateful, sometimes angry

Straschnitzki was badly hurt in the accident: a spinal injury, broken ribs, a broken collar bone, a punctured lung and bleeding in his head and pelvic area.

"So many upper body injuries. It's kind of amazing that my body was able to survive and I could get out of that alive. I'm just so grateful."

The April 6 collision between the team's bus and a tractor-trailer at a rural intersection in Saskatchewan is still being investigated. The Broncos were on their way to a playoff game. Sixteen people were killed and 13 were injured. RCMP have only said the truck was in the intersection when the crash occurred.

"There's all sorts of mixed emotions really — anger could be one of those. It's kind of tough to talk about sometimes. It's not all the time, but it's once in a while."

Straschnitzki keeps in touch with his teammates through online group chats. During the interview, his cellphone dinged steadily as he received more and more texts.

He said his friend Jacob Wasserman, the team's goaltender, is also paralyzed, but from the navel down. Both are interested in playing sledge hockey once their recovery is complete.

Aims to walk again

Straschnitzki spends his day in rehab and with video games. Giant containers of potato chips and beef jerky are close at hand.

He's had a lot of visitors, including Canadian wheelchair athlete Rick Hansen

"He's a really great guy and really inspirational for sure," Straschnitzki said.

"He told me there's more to a person than their legs ... you don't let it get you down and you get up and do something about it. You just keep pushing through."

One of Straschnitzki's aims is to walk again.

"That's the big goal in mind. If I can be able to push myself and do that ... then that proves it to everyone. I've heard some news which is pretty tragic, but doctors have always been wrong before," he said.

"I think just having the mindset that you can do this for sure will help."
 

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Tonight is the NHL Awards show in Vegas.

LAS VEGAS — One by one, the biggest names in the NHL ducked into a private room at the Wynn Encore on the Strip to share a word and a moment with the Humboldt Broncos.

From Connor McDavid to P.K. Subban, they paused for selfies and told stories, soaking up the common bond that ties them all together – the fact that they are all just “hockey guys” at their core.

“It’s heartwarming,” Broncos defenceman Ryan Straschnitzki said, adjusting to his new normal in a wheelchair after being paralyzed in April’s accident. “It helps us heal.”

The boys were all smiles on Tuesday. The real emotional scene occurred in the Calgary airport on Monday, when 10 of the 13 survivors of the crash were reunited for the first time at the airport there to fly to Vegas for the NHL Awards show held on Wednesday night.

“It’s unbelievable just being together again,” Broncos winger Kaleb Dahlgren said. “You are with them every day. You miss them. You just want to give them a hug.

“We all have guardian angels somewhere that took care of us.”

The rest of the hockey world is trying to take care of Humboldt now. The NHL and NHLPA announced that a group of players – spearheaded by St. Louis Blues forward – will descend on Humboldt on Aug. 24 to hold an on-ice skills competition at Elgar Petersen Arena.

That’s also the day Washington Capitals forward , a Saskatchewan native, plans to bring the Stanley Cup to Humboldt.

In the meantime, the NHL will pay tribute to the Broncos at the Awards show on Wednesday night at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino and then bring them along to the Draft in Dallas this weekend.

“It’s overwhelming,” Dalhgren said. “In a good way.”

Watching NHL players skate in Humboldt near the Stanley Cup in August will be a celebration, a positive for the tight-knit town of 5,800 that are Saskatchewan Strong, but there is always the elephant in the room.

That scar that won’t go away is what some of the NHL’s stars had a difficult time coming to grips with on Tuesday. This is all still fresh.

“You just see it in their faces,” Panthers goaltender said. “They’ve been through a lot, they’ve seen a lot. You just try to make them at ease as much as you can. If you can do that, only for a few moments, you try. You try to put yourself in those shoes but it’s impossible to do that.”

It’s not the same type of tragedy, but Luongo said what he sees the Broncos are going through is not all that different from what he is witnessing in his hometown in Florida after the shootings at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School.

The Stoneman Douglas hockey team, which went on to win the Florida state title shortly after the attack, will be honoured on Wednesday night as well.

Luongo knows that like in Parkland, Fla., what happened will never leave Humboldt. His son, Gianni, was in lockdown at a nearby school and hid in a closet for three hours.

“I know a lot of people are moving on from it, but back home it’s still a daily thing for us,” Luongo said. “We hear it every day. We talk about it every day. Whether it’s on TV or you walk into a store, it’s all over the place. It will take a long time to get back to where we were. We try to do as much as we can to help. Sometimes it feels like it’s not enough.”

It helped. For at least a few minutes on Tuesday, and a few hours this week, it was a welcomed diversion for the Broncos. They got to meet their hockey heroes.

“This whole experience, you watch [the Awards] on TV and you always think how cool it would be to be there,” Dahlgren said. “But to see it – it brought a tear to our eyes.”

It choked up a couple NHL players, as well.

“It’s a special group of kids,” Subban said. “Obviously with what they went through this year, it touched everybody … even people that don’t know anything about hockey can resonate with a story like that.

“I feel like after that story and hearing what happened, everybody kind of held their loved ones a little bit closer. It’s important for them to know that the inspiration they provide people runs deep.”

The inspiration was palpable as the Broncos shared their progress on-stage wearing their yellow and green sweaters.

Derek Patter announced he plans to return to play for the Broncos next season. Xavier Labelle will graduate high school on-time despite a lengthy stay in hospital. Bryce Fiske plans to play for former NHLer at the Univ. of Ontario Institute of Technology. Graysen Cameron will coach a midget team back in Red Deer, Alta., while goaltender Jacob Wassermann plans to try sledge hockey despite his paralysis.

The road has not been easy and there are still miles ahead of some. Straschnitzki has been rehabilitating in Philadelphia and will return there after the Draft to continue his quest to regain mobility. Not far removed from hospital, Smith wants to keep playing but is dealing with significant nerve damage in his left hand and arm.

“Three others weren’t available [to make the trip],” Dalhgren said. “We do it for them.”

They remain strong for the 16 members of the Broncos organization that weren’t as lucky and their families. Together again and wearing that proud jersey, Dahlgren said there is not one moment they are taking for granted.

“It’s important we get together as much as we can,” Smith said. “We can cry together, we can laugh together.”
 

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Stephenson taking Stanley Cup to Humboldt to help town heal


Chandler Stephenson was mid-celebration on the ice after winning the Stanley Cup when someone yelled his name.

Stephenson looked up into the stands and saw Brayden Camrud, a friend from back home who played for the Humboldt Broncos junior team. Camrud and Kaleb Dahlgren, another friend of Stephenson’s, survived the April bus crash on the prairie of Saskatchewan that killed 16 people, including 11 of their teammates.
Stephenson knew at the beginning of the playoffs he wanted to take the Cup to Humboldt if he and the Washington Capitals won it. When the Capitals led the Vegas Golden Knights 3-1 in the final, the 24-year-old said it was his intent to share his day with the Cup with the people of Humboldt. He is from nearby Saskatoon.

He will make good on that commitment Friday, hoping his small gesture will help somehow.

“The community deserves to have a good day,” Stephenson said. “We’re not trying to be saviors by any means because nothing can replace a life. We’re just trying to make it as positive a day as we can and hopefully put some smiles and some laughs on some people’s faces.”

Stephenson will be joined by more than a dozen current and former players for Humboldt Hockey Day, organized by the NHL and NHLPA to celebrate the strength and resilience of the town of 6,000. Broncos spokeswoman Tammy Robert called it a baby step in a complicated healing process for victims, their loved ones and everyone affected.

“This day is designed to bring some of the joy back to the game of hockey for the community of Humboldt,” Robert said. “It’s about clearing the way for the new 2018-19 season for the Humboldt Broncos team and just giving them the opportunity to have fun.”

Those opportunities have been in short supply since the April 6 crash, when the team bus on its way to a playoff game was hit by a truck. The hockey world that so often functions like a small town grieved together as NHL teams paid tribute with stickers and moments of silence and an online fundraising effort raised more than $15 million for the victims.

In an attempt to figure out what might best help those in Humboldt, former NHL defenseman Andrew Ference reached out to Colorado Avalanche general manager and Hockey Hall of Famer Joe Sakic, who survived the 1986 Swift Current Broncos crash that killed four people.

“His big message was that you can only do so much, first of all, but also that every person is going to arrive at their grief, or they’re going to deal with it, in different ways and it’s going to be at different times,” said Ference, who is now the NHL’s director of social impact, growth and fan development. “There’s not one blanket kind of reaction to a whole group.”

Stephenson knows that. He was thrilled to see Camrud in Las Vegas when the Capitals won the Cup and is glad to be skating with Dahlgren again this summer. He understands many others weren’t so lucky, which is why he thought of Humboldt before planning any other activity he’d do in his short period with the Cup.

“Your time with the Cup isn’t exactly forever, so I think it’s just really special that he’s willing to do that,” said Humboldt Broncos alum and retired defenseman Sheldon Brookbank, who won it with Chicago in 2013. “I think the Cup being there is going to just bring a little bit of joy back to the community. There’s something about that Stanley Cup, every time you see it or are in the same room as it, it just brings that certain awe factor.”

Members of the Broncos organization will be around Stephenson and the Cup for a private function before he takes the famous trophy to a public event in the afternoon that will feature street hockey with the likes of Ference, Adam Graves, Calgary’s Travis Hamonic and St. Louis’ Brayden Schenn. Ference said players who have never won the Cup often steer clear of someone’s day with it, but this is an exception.

“When this opportunity presented itself to do something around Chandler’s day and to go in and be with the community and do something fun like street hockey and just hanging out around the local rink, guys stepped up and they wanted to be a part of it,” Ference said. “There definitely wasn’t any arm-twisting involved.”

Robert said the NHL and NHLPA have been “a rock behind the scenes” for the Broncos, calling this event an extension of that support. Brookbank, who spent time this summer visiting injured players at Saskatoon City Hospital, understands the role hockey plays in the community. He figures the Cup being there will make a difference.

“It’s small-town Saskatchewan,” Brookbank said. “It’s a really special thing, and the Stanley Cup doesn’t get out there that often. For Chandler to do that, I just think that’s amazing on him.”
 
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