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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Wipes right off, I’ll say that within reason as I haven’t let stuff sit on it, but doing oil change on my mower, filling it with gas etc it easily cleans off. Over the summer I have an old brush for washing cars, put soap and water in a bucket then hose it out. Looks like new
Nothing penetrates between the joints? That would be my biggest fear. It does look good!
 

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What’s the usual cost to have a company do a 3 car garage?
Depends on where you live I’m sure, but I have heard $5-8/ sq ft…
 

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Nothing penetrates between the joints? That would be my biggest fear. It does look good!
Joint is really tight, and I’m a bit ocd on messes so I don’t let stuff sit on the floor but I’d imagine if you left liquid on it for extended time it would find its way. Has channels underneath to allow for air/water flow assuming the floor is pitched properly. May not be for everyone but for me it fit the bill. Existing floor was stained a bit and had some heavy chipping in areas from previous owners.
 

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Just like mentioned above, prep is key. About 10 years ago, after letting the concrete fully cure for about 3 months after building a new house, I used the ArmorSeal Rexthane epoxy from Sherwin Williams. I've used a few other DIY epoxy coating systems that don't work but the ArmorSeal system has been rock solid and still looks new! I did a grey color with the multi-color flakes and cleared it all. It's been through all types of automotive fluids, jack stands, floor jacks, tools and just about everything else you can think of. Absolutely the best and you can definitely do it yourself, plus the guys at Sherwin Williams will help you out too! There may be better out there but you can't beat this from a DIY perspective. View attachment 164349
Your garage gives me wood.
 

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Prep is ABSOLUTELY the key.
For grip, you can get SHARKGRIP (from Sherwin Williams) and spread it over the clear after you lay the top layer. When broadcasting both the flakes and the SHARKGRIP, the best method is to toss it as high into the air and let it fall onto the ground.

Couple tricks
  • I'll mention prep again. DO NOT skimp here, you'll regret it with the epoxy lifting
  • Get a couple good pairs of spikes for shoes so you can walk on the surface when bakrolling
  • Be prepared to backroll quite a few times to get the bubbles out
  • Depending on the size of the garage, it might be helpful to have a buddy with you and mix more material as the first batch is getting laid out
  • Get a propane torch. If you are having troubles with bubbles, the heat helps to pop them and flow out the epoxy
  • Laying the clear coat will get weird. As it flows onto the base, it's like pouring water on a sheet of ice. It will flow really strange. Get the best coverage you can and be prepared to backroll a LOT more than the base to get it spread across as it slightly hardens.
  • I actually recommend two layers of clear. Because of the way it flows, if you surface isn't PERFECTLY flat (trust me - it's not), you will get small pooling of the clear in low spots and thin or not enough coverage in high spots
  • Think about what you will be using the garage for when choosing colors. I initially wanted to do a darker with some accent colors flowed in to create a cool and unique look. However, I use my garage as a garage. I build cars and am always tinkering with something. I inevitably drop a few bolts, screws and other small parts. If I had a cool color scheme, finding them would be difficult. So I chose a lighter gray and minimal flake coverage just so I could see things better.
  • The area near the door will yellow unless you use a poly. And poly is more difficult to deploy and has a high VOC. Mine is yellowed, but not to the point it bothers me.
  • Look at Garage Journal - LOTS of good info here.
  • DO NOT use big-box store epoxy. You will be pulling it up in a couple months. I used Epoxy-Coat on both garages. Worked flawlessly.
  • If you have any questions, feel free to hit me up. Happy to help
I corrected the SHARKGRIP topcoat anti slip product from Sherwin Williams. Good stuff. And Jim, a great list of ideas and tips.

I did my own garage. I prepped the hell out of it and my ArmorPoxy has held firm. I made a couple of mistakes. First, I put on too much topcoat. It yellowed, and it is all my fault and that pisses me off. I see it every day in the first corner that I did. Second, I did not put enough anti slip product on top and when it gets wet it is damn slippery. Not a smart thing to do in a garage. One beef that I do not believe is my fault is where the rear wheels sit - the top coat has peeled in about a 1 square foot area. Not happy. Other than that it is do-able for a rookie. Garage Journal is a great place for help and ideas. I frequent the forum.
 

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Listen to the guys. I didn‘t get up al the old oil and every bit of it leaked through. Thought I did, but clearly didn’t. Now I have a redo. That was almost 2 years ago and I‘ve yet to do it again. Have the supplies, just not the time. Sure want to getter done.
it went from this
Rectangle Road surface Asphalt Grey Flooring


To this in a day, in a lot of places
Atmosphere Liquid Water Fluid Sunlight

So grind the heck out of any oil places.
Good luck
 

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I did my garage in my previous house myself. I used a commercial grade of Rustoleum Garage Floor Epoxy and Rustoleum epoxy clear coat. I had it for over 10 years, no issues. Prep is definitely what took the longest. Was perfect concrete so just etched it and cleaned it thoroughly and let it dry serveral days. This is through Michigan winters and salt. Make sure the use Sharkbite additive and not sand.
I also used Rustoleum on my floor 16 years ago - still holding up well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I corrected the SHARKGRIP topcoat anti slip product from Sherwin Williams. Good stuff. And Jim, a great list of ideas and tips.

I did my own garage. I prepped the hell out of it and my ArmorPoxy has held firm. I made a couple of mistakes. First, I put on too much topcoat. It yellowed, and it is all my fault and that pisses me off. I see it every day in the first corner that I did. Second, I did not put enough anti slip product on top and when it gets wet it is damn slippery. Not a smart thing to do in a garage. One beef that I do not believe is my fault is where the rear wheels sit - the top coat has peeled in about a 1 square foot area. Not happy. Other than that it is do-able for a rookie. Garage Journal is a great place for help and ideas. I frequent the forum.
ArmorPoxy was one of the products I was looking at. Did you do the flakes? I would like to do full flake. Do you have any pictures? Would you use it again, with non slip?
 

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Actually, I probably would use ArmorPoxy again. As everyone has mentioned, surface prep is the single most important step. Talk with folks like us who have done it. Do it by the book. Again, Garage Journal is a great source for information.
Garage Journal
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
What did the company say about the peeling? That would annoy the fuck outta me.
 

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They offered to send me a little can of topcoat. I said screw it. Now it really bugs the heck outta me.
 
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