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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve found many threads asking about how guys wanna have LED’s for the V2 front turn signals. Including myself. Up to a couple of years ago no one had yet to do this mod. I’m certainly not an electrical guy, but figured by now someone would have figured this out. On my old CTS I had taken the light housing out and attempted to find the right wire to put the load resistor on, but never was able to do it. I have found the right LED bulbs, put them in, but was never able to get them working without the dreaded hyper flash. Now, they sit and collect dust.

So my question to y’all is, has anyone heard of how we get this mod done yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You probably just need a load resistor installed in line with the LED bulb.

LOAD RESISTOR
I tried on my old CTS 3.6 a few years ago but was unable to find the right wire the load resistor went to. The wiring in these headlights are a lot different than anything I’ve ever seen. As a matter of fact, if I remember correctly there were 4 very thin wires for the turn signal and I tried all four(possibly 3). No luck!
as far as a flasher goes, I haven’t a clue! Was hoping someone had done this mod by now.
Still very shocked no one has figured this out by now
 

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Kenny, have you gone back to the old CTS Forum and checked? One possibility.
 

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You probably just need a load resistor installed in line with the LED bulb.
It'll work better if you install the load resistor across the bulb, not in series/in line with the bulb. It can go anywhere in the circuit, up to and including directly across the back side of the bulb. If you know where the connector to the bulb connects to the bulb, that's where you can install your load resistor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It'll work better if you install the load resistor across the bulb, not in series/in line with the bulb. It can go anywhere in the circuit, up to and including directly across the back side of the bulb. If you know where the connector to the bulb connects to the bulb, that's where you can install your load resistor.
Pardon my ignorance when I say this, but your saying I could solder the resistor to the bulb itself? I am definitely going to have to tear it apart and take a good look at it someday. If you read my earlier post I believe I said there are several wires coming from the bulb area. Very different than your average turn signal or brake lights/turn signals. I remember VERY thin wires that I had tried to attach the resistor to with no success.
I actually have my bumper halfway off now as I started recently taking it apart to paint my grills, so maybe(I will) I’ll look closer this coming weekend or within the next few weeks.
 

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Well, if you solder to the back of the bulb, you're going to have trouble getting the bulb in the socket. You need a schematic of the wiring of the lamp to be sure, but there should only be 3 wires at most per bulb (if it's a two filament bulb) or just 2 wires if it's a single filament. If you can identify the wires on the plug that connects to the socket where the bulb is installed that energize the filament when there's an incandescent bulb in the socket, you can put the load resistor across those two wires and plug in a LED bulb and it ought to work just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, if you solder to the back of the bulb, you're going to have trouble getting the bulb in the socket. You need a schematic of the wiring of the lamp to be sure, but there should only be 3 wires at most per bulb (if it's a two filament bulb) or just 2 wires if it's a single filament. If you can identify the wires on the plug that connects to the socket where the bulb is installed that energize the filament when there's an incandescent bulb in the socket, you can put the load resistor across those two wires and plug in a LED bulb and it ought to work just fine.
Great advice Rocket! Not positive exactly how many wires are in that particular l;Ishtar socket, but I do remember it being very different than normal ones. I’ll take a look soon and see how it looks. I’ll also take some pics and post when done. Much appreciated!
 

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I installed my resistor inside my lamp assy... I didn't want to expose or modify the wiring harness on the engine bay side. I been running LEDs since I posted about it a while ago 2018ish, no issues bright as hell. The Lamp assy gets hot anyways due to the HID's, these resistors don't get hot enough to harm anything, but zip tie it away from other wires.

Amazon.com: SYLVANIA - Load Equalizer 27 Watt (at 12.8V) - Turn Signal Load Equalizer for LED Light Bulbs, Corrects Hyper Flash & Bulb Out Warning (Pack of 2) : Automotive
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I installed my resistor inside my lamp assy... I didn't want to expose or modify the wiring harness on the engine bay side. I been running LEDs since I posted about it a while ago 2018ish, no issues bright as hell. The Lamp assy gets hot anyways due to the HID's, these resistors don't get hot enough to harm anything, but zip tie it away from other wires.

Amazon.com: SYLVANIA - Load Equalizer 27 Watt (at 12.8V) - Turn Signal Load Equalizer for LED Light Bulbs, Corrects Hyper Flash & Bulb Out Warning (Pack of 2) : Automotive
What most of us are looking for(at least I am) is which wire, or where exactly we install the resistor for the turn signals. Resistor we know, which wire we don’t. Got any pics? That would be really helpful CamCamaro. Thanks brother
 

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What most of us are looking for(at least I am) is which wire, or where exactly we install the resistor for the turn signals. Resistor we know, which wire we don’t. Got any pics? That would be really helpful CamCamaro. Thanks brother
no pics sorry CTS_Kenny, when you take the access caps off the back of the HL housing to swap the bulb to LED, you'll see the wires for turn signal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
no pics sorry CTS_Kenny, when you take the access caps off the back of the HL housing to swap the bulb to LED, you'll see the wires for turn signal.
Ok so I have the whole bumper off(painting the grills) and headlights out. I was way wrong about there being more than two wires coming from the turn signal bulbs. I guess my memory is shot. Nevertheless, I see 2 BLACK wires. Now, can you or someone explain exactly where the resistor goes. DI’d you connect the resistor to one of each of the black wires?
 

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The resistor goes across the two wires, not in series with one or the other. Think of it this way - strip a little insulation off both of the wires, connect one side of the resistor to one wire and the other side of the resistor to the other wire. Note, though, I don't recommend you do it exactly this way, since bare exposed wires are bad.

It's a Light Emitting Diode and need's a resistor to function properly.
The LED bulb doesn't need a resistor to function properly. But OBD-II does. The NTSB mandated requirement nowadays is that the computer that controls the lights in the car must be capable of detecting if a bulb is burned out. They do that by measuring current flow through the bulb. LEDs take a lot less current than an incandescent filament (which is why LED bulbs in your house can produce the same amount of light at a much lower power draw). The car's computer will see the LED as a burned out bulb if the car wasn't designed for LEDs. When you put a dummy load across the same wires that power the LED, that resistor allows more current to flow through the circuit and it fools the computer in to thinking there's an incandescent filament there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The resistor goes across the two wires, not in series with one or the other. Think of it this way - strip a little insulation off both of the wires, connect one side of the resistor to one wire and the other side of the resistor to the other wire. Note, though, I don't recommend you do it exactly this way, since bare exposed wires are bad.



The LED bulb doesn't need a resistor to function properly. But OBD-II does. The NTSB mandated requirement nowadays is that the computer that controls the lights in the car must be capable of detecting if a bulb is burned out. They do that by measuring current flow through the bulb. LEDs take a lot less current than an incandescent filament (which is why LED bulbs in your house can produce the same amount of light at a much lower power draw). The car's computer will see the LED as a burned out bulb if the car wasn't designed for LEDs. When you put a dummy load across the same wires that power the LED, that resistor allows more current to flow through the circuit and it fools the computer in to thinking there's an incandescent filament there.
Now that’s exactly what I needed to hear. Thanks Rocket. Ill post pics when done. Much appreciated
 
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