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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Disclaimer: There are no dyno graphs and I received a modest discount on my purchase in exchange for writing a review.

Cliff Notes:
The BMR catch can is a great alternative to the other options on the market. Everything needed was literally in the box, it's a high quality unit and has a larger internal volume than most other cans. If your LSA is an oil-guzzling bastard like mine, the volume is a big bonus.

Pros:
* Well made (USA! USA! USA!); really - a quality unit. It's a snug fit but no rubbing or major interference during the install.
* Complete as purchased - no extra lid handle required! Even the 3/8" hose is high quality relative to what I buy locally. The only thing missing was some plumber's tape for the petcock and brass drain fitting.
* Push-on AN barbs were included and make hooking everything up easy.
* Check valve and drain line also included for easy draining.
* Specific mounting location that will not interfere with coolant reservoirs or cold air intakes; IMHO this was a great design feature.
* No "controlled vacuum leak" bullshit that the RevXtreme guys pushed for so long.

Cons:
* Currently more expensive than other units.
* The instructions are complete, but not polished or professional in appearance.
* Plastic check valves are fragile and will break if you have to remove a hose. Having an extra would have been nice.

Caveats:
* M6 guys have to drill out a small rivet on the bracket that holds the clutch fluid reservoir. It was so easy and accessible that I did not consider this a negative; merely something to be aware of.
* Push on fittings can be a bear to remove if you change your mind or make a mistake. I'd recommend some grease to help slip them on and a heat gun (or razor blade...) if you have to pull them off.

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Installation Instructions:

Step 1: Remove the strut brace held on by (2) 18mm nuts and (2) 18mm bolts.


Step 2: (A6 guys can skip this) Remove the clutch fluid reservoir by pulling up and moving it out of the way. You will see a single rivet on the top of this bracket, near the firewall: drill it out with a 1/4" bit.




There is a keeper on the bottom of the bracket that can be pried off with a screwdriver; the keeper and bracket can be thrown into that pile of "left over parts" you will hang onto for years to come.

Step 3: Prepare the BMR tank for mounting. Install and tighten the three barb fittings, the drain petcock:



Install one of the screw clips onto the tab next to the firewall, where you drilled out the rivet (the second will go on the front of the BMR tank flange, where it will bolts to the strut brace - the tab is at the lower right of the second picture):



Step 3A: The drain petcock comes with a small lever installed, but has other handle types included. You can swap these out by removing a single screw holding the lever to the petcock. I used the longest lever for better leverage with the BMR tank installed, but clipped it shorter to avoid interference with the fender (see photo). With brass and cast fittings such as these, use plumber's tape to wrap the threads prior to assembly and tighten with reasonable force. It needs to be snug, not torqued to 100 foot-pounds. I cut a piece of ~2 foot line and attached it to the petcock and brass barb fitting, then installed into the tank. You will not be able to easily do this once the tank is installed on the car!



Note the petcock lever has been trimmed for clearance. You will not be able to see it with the strut brace back on the car! Remember that "down" is "open." :)



Step 4: Mount the tank at the rear first, on the firewall using the screw and clip provided. It will support the tank for now, but be careful when hooking up the press-fit lines as you could break something.

Step 4A: For M6 guys, you will need to adjust the tang on the side of BMR tank for your clutch fluid reservoir by bending it enough to ensure clearance. There is a wiring harness on the valve cover that will get in the way: bend the tang on the tank until everything fits. Reconnect clutch reservoir by sliding it onto the bracket.


Step 5: The U-shaped factory hose that connects the lower valley line to the supercharger snout inlet, conveniently located under a whole bunch of other shit in between the passenger side cylinder head and the snout:


Remove the factory plastic PCV line from the valley and snout connections as shown (leave the upper plastic "Y" line that connects to the intake tube in place). Note that the connectors have a plastic lock ring securing them in place: find the tab on the fitting, push it out and then pull the fittings off the snout and valley connections. A long, thin screwdriver can be useful here.


NOTE: If you remove this 10mm bolt, the boost bypass valve diaphram can be moved out of the way, making it easier to get to the valley and supercharger snout inlets.



Step 6: Updated 12/12 to remove prior routing system which can contribute to oil leaks from high crankcase pressure!
Run your 3/8" hose from the valley line to the catch can INLET, then from the can back to the S/C Snout for the "valley-snout" configuration. Leave a little extra and then trim as needed, there is plenty of hose included.


--- edited ----


Step 7: Reinstall the strut brace (make sure the screw clip is on the BMR tank first!). Tighten down your 4 strut brace nuts/bolts and then use the included screw to secure the BMR tank to the strut brace. Interestingly, BMR uses a pre-existing hole in the strut brace that I never noticed before...


Step 8: Secure your drain line to the plastic wheel well liner, or as desired to keep it off your exhaust. I drilled a hole in the wheel well liner and secured it with a zip tie. The red tape is just to help me see it for draining, and the bolt is to prevent drips AFTER I drain it.



Check for clearance on your exhaust or any leaks!

The finished product:



ETA 09/16/16:
I compared the oil captured from my original catch can (the dual Saikou Michi), which I ran essentially as two cans in series via the single valley-SC, to the BMR can run in the same fashion. Although I had ~5k miles on the SM can and only ~4k miles on the BMR... the Saikou Michi captured literally double the amount of oil product as the BMR.

After this, I have to say that the Saikou Michi (run in series) is cheaper, takes up less space, has no issues hitting the wiper motor - which my revised BMR can still does - and captures more blow-by than the BMR.

IMHO, the Saikou Michi continues to be "the best" oil catch can for our vehicles. Other people like other cans, but they are all single-can design and I suspect having the dual can style with the SM is the key as to why it is almost twice as effective.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
No Pics??? Jeeez. j/k Nice write up! but really would like to see pictures of it installed, cause I wanted to be the first cunt to say so.
Refresh your browser, you cunt! These things take time... geez! :D

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BMR Recommended PCV system routing:


*** YOU WILL GET EXCESSIVE CRANKCASE PRESSURE IF YOU USE THE CHECK VALVES ***

What's in the box?




BMR Tank up-close look:

There is definitely steel mesh / wire on the "inlet" sides for condensing oil vapor and slowing down velocity to improve condensation and effectiveness.


There is a perforated drip plate keeping the wire mesh in place, just beneath the inlets:


There is a slosh plate underneath the "outlet" line to keep condensed oil from getting pulled through:


Based on the size of the tank next to my Saikou Michi dual cans (that I ran in series), I'd estimate the internal volume of the BMR tank to be almost twice that of the SM can, but I did not bother to measure.



After checking out the tank that I received, I believe its construction is very close to this:
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Beautiful write up! Thanks for all the pics and diagrams.
 

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Nicely done. Only constructive comment would be to add the check-valve location on your diagram.

I have the same can for my auto V. The check valves proved problematic for me as I ended up building too much crakcase pressure routing everything per BMR and blowing out my oil pan gasket. There were no instructions or diagrams included when I bought mine, just the sketch they posted on the into thread. A bit of a nightmare there. I ended up ditching the driver side inlet, capping that nipple, and removing the check-valves and it's fine now albeit not taking advantage of the dual-inlet design.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nicely done. Only constructive comment would be to add the check-valve location on your diagram.

I have the same can for my auto V. The check valves proved problematic for me as I ended up building too much crakcase pressure routing everything per BMR and blowing out my oil pan gasket. There were no instructions or diagrams included when I bought mine, just the sketch they posted on the into thread. A bit of a nightmare there. I ended up ditching the driver side inlet, capping that nipple, and removing the check-valves and it's fine now albeit not taking advantage of the dual-inlet design.
That's an interesting observation. Some finite amount of pressure is needed to open a check valve, so I think they may be optional.

I have a new spot of oil on the garage so I will have to investigate.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

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A note from the owner:

For high crank case pressure scenario's we do offer a vented catch can that we also include in our turbo kit. You can run a single inlet, single outlet catch can and just do the valley-snout configuration, however this is not a fix for high crank case pressure.

In a high crank case situation the best fix would be to vent both valve covers (individually), and the valley cover to atmosphere.

We recently found that our catch interferes with the windshield wipers.... This was a function that we did not test in Arizona.... And obviously most V owners that bought this catch can do not drive in the rain, because it took a long time for anyone to notice!

We have been contacting and swapping catch cans slowly as we get them built. However, if you would like to get into a vented catch can now we can do that as well.


A photo to show the revisions that were made to the back to allow for wiper arm clearance:

 

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That's an interesting observation. Some finite amount of pressure is needed to open a check valve, so I think they may be optional.

I have a new spot of oil on the garage so I will have to investigate.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
Let me know once you determine where the oil is coming from! Unfortunately, I smelled the oil burning off my exhaust before I noticed oil collecting on the garage floor. By the time I realized it, it was too late and I now have a nicely stained stainless exhaust. It took me three hours to clean the underside of the car getting all of the oil off of all of the nooks and crannies. When my oil leaked it covered everything under the car from the pan back.

With that said, I am very happy with the can despite this issue and I believe BMR did a nice job on this design overall, despite disagreement on proper vac routing / valving. Hope this doesn't come across as thread crapping.


A note from the owner:

For high crank case pressure scenario's we do offer a vented catch can that we also include in our turbo kit. You can run a single inlet, single outlet catch can and just do the valley-snout configuration, however this is not a fix for high crank case pressure.

In a high crank case situation the best fix would be to vent both valve covers (individually), and the valley cover to atmosphere.

We recently found that our catch interferes with the windshield wipers.... This was a function that we did not test in Arizona.... And obviously most V owners that bought this catch can do not drive in the rain, because it took a long time for anyone to notice!

We have been contacting and swapping catch cans slowly as we get them built. However, if you would like to get into a vented catch can now we can do that as well.


A photo to show the revisions that were made to the back to allow for wiper arm clearance:

As luck would have it...here in North Texas we had our wettest fall in history and I have been wondering why my wipers developed a "clunk" that I can feel down through the brake pedal. I will be checking the backside of the can tonight!
 

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That's an interesting observation. Some finite amount of pressure is needed to open a check valve, so I think they may be optional.

I have a new spot of oil on the garage so I will have to investigate.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
Let me know once you determine where the oil is coming from! Unfortunately, I smelled the oil burning off my exhaust before I noticed oil collecting on the garage floor. By the time I realized it, it was too late and I now have a nicely stained stainless exhaust. It took me three hours to clean the underside of the car getting all of the oil off of all of the nooks and crannies. When my oil leaked it covered everything under the car from the pan back.

With that said, I am very happy with the can despite this issue and I believe BMR did a nice job on this design overall, despite disagreement on proper vac routing / valving. Hope this doesn't come across as thread crapping.


A note from the owner:

For high crank case pressure scenario's we do offer a vented catch can that we also include in our turbo kit. You can run a single inlet, single outlet catch can and just do the valley-snout configuration, however this is not a fix for high crank case pressure.

In a high crank case situation the best fix would be to vent both valve covers (individually), and the valley cover to atmosphere.

We recently found that our catch interferes with the windshield wipers.... This was a function that we did not test in Arizona.... And obviously most V owners that bought this catch can do not drive in the rain, because it took a long time for anyone to notice!

We have been contacting and swapping catch cans slowly as we get them built. However, if you would like to get into a vented catch can now we can do that as well.


A photo to show the revisions that were made to the back to allow for wiper arm clearance:

As luck would have it...here in North Texas we had our wettest fall in history and I have been wondering why my wipers developed a "clunk" that I can feel down through the brake pedal. I will be checking the backside of the can tonight!
 

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As luck would have it...here in North Texas we had our wettest fall in history and I have been wondering why my wipers developed a "clunk" that I can feel down through the brake pedal. I will be checking the backside of the can tonight!
Let me know, if you can't get it adjusted to clear than we will exchange the tank for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Let me know once you determine where the oil is coming from! Unfortunately, I smelled the oil burning off my exhaust before I noticed oil collecting on the garage floor. By the time I realized it, it was too late and I now have a nicely stained stainless exhaust. It took me three hours to clean the underside of the car getting all of the oil off of all of the nooks and crannies. When my oil leaked it covered everything under the car from the pan back.

With that said, I am very happy with the can despite this issue and I believe BMR did a nice job on this design overall, despite disagreement on proper vac routing / valving. Hope this doesn't come across as thread crapping.
Although I am not worried about the appearance of my exhaust, it is somewhat concerning to blow oil out of the rear main seal from increased crankcase pressure. Not only is it unsightly (when seeing smoke billowing out the back of your late model Cadillac on the highway), but I'm worried the seal will continue to leak and need to be replaced? It will not be easy or cheap to do that IF so given how hard it is to drop the pan on these cars!

I change my own oil and was under the car during the installation of the can last week with no issues; I park in the same spot in my garage nightly for the past 2+ years and am very observant of any new stains or spots on the floor when I pull in. The new oil (and burnt smell that I initially thought could have been my clutch!) started the day after I installed the can - so it's a no-brainer; changing the PCV system resulted in the leak. It was a LOT of oil, as in, like several spots on the floor as it ran down the header collectors and various lines from being sprayed around while driving.

For now, to avoid more loss of oil I have reverted to a single-can design by going from the lower valley outlet to the BMR can, then back again to the S/C snout. I replaced the factory plastic lines running from the intake tube to each valve cover and capped the second "inlet" on the BMR tank that is now unused. This will be good enough for filtering and I hope the leak stops but I'll have to crawl under the car and clean everything up then monitor to know for sure.

I haven't tested my windshield wipers yet... fingers crossed!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A note from the owner:

For high crank case pressure scenario's we do offer a vented catch can that we also include in our turbo kit. You can run a single inlet, single outlet catch can and just do the valley-snout configuration, however this is not a fix for high crank case pressure.

In a high crank case situation the best fix would be to vent both valve covers (individually), and the valley cover to atmosphere.
How does one know they have a "high crank case pressure scenario" before installing a can and getting oil blown out of a front or rear main seal? :D

Can you elaborate on what would cause that (ie blow-by from poor ring seal?) and why your PCV system routing would be more susceptible to it relative to the OEM configuration?

I ask that because, per our emails, I am one of the lucky winners of "HCCPS" but didn't have any issues with the factory routing (I had a different catch can in the valley-snout configuration for 20k miles or longer without issue)?

Thanks for standing behind your products!
 

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Random, I have the same concerns. I haven't been able to put my can in yet but I don't like the idea of a potential and costly issue with the possibility of oil leaks.
 

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Random, I have the same concerns. I haven't been able to put my can in yet but I don't like the idea of a potential and costly issue with the possibility of oil leaks.
I believe running the can as a single-can design via the valley / snout will eliminate that risk: I ran my saikou michi can in the same manner and never had an issue. I talked with BMR about whether there is an issue with their suggested routing, the check valves or some other unknown issue, but once I noticed the oil pooling I reverted my BMR can back to the single loop (valley to catch can, back to snout - leaving all other factory hoses in place) and I *think* the problem is resolved.

Again, I have to verify there are no leaks, but I had this setup before trying the new/improved routing with another can so it should be a non-issue. IMHO, the BMR can itself is still a great design - the issue here is whether or not to adopt their recommended hose routing.

Pending further investigation, I would recommend only the valley-snout route and cap the second inlet with a rubber vacuum cap or AN fitting; with no check valves. You'll get excellent filtering and volume via the route that most people choose anyway; and the risk of blowing out a gasket would be no greater than running the stock PCV setup! Anything beyond that may be outside of my ability to answer.

I will update my original posts once I verify a few more things.
 

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Although I am not worried about the appearance of my exhaust, it is somewhat concerning to blow oil out of the rear main seal from increased crankcase pressure. Not only is it unsightly (when seeing smoke billowing out the back of your late model Cadillac on the highway), but I'm worried the seal will continue to leak and need to be replaced? It will not be easy or cheap to do that IF so given how hard it is to drop the pan on these cars!

I change my own oil and was under the car during the installation of the can last week with no issues; I park in the same spot in my garage nightly for the past 2+ years and am very observant of any new stains or spots on the floor when I pull in. The new oil (and burnt smell that I initially thought could have been my clutch!) started the day after I installed the can - so it's a no-brainer; changing the PCV system resulted in the leak. It was a LOT of oil, as in, like several spots on the floor as it ran down the header collectors and various lines from being sprayed around while driving.

For now, to avoid more loss of oil I have reverted to a single-can design by going from the lower valley outlet to the BMR can, then back again to the S/C snout. I replaced the factory plastic lines running from the intake tube to each valve cover and capped the second "inlet" on the BMR tank that is now unused. This will be good enough for filtering and I hope the leak stops but I'll have to crawl under the car and clean everything up then monitor to know for sure.

I haven't tested my windshield wipers yet... fingers crossed!
This is exactly what my symptoms were, spots on the ground which turned into puddles, and burning oil smell at stop lights. I "fixed" the issue by removing the check valves and reverting to standard routing, and capping the extra fitting...same as you. ~2 months have passed and no more issues. My fear though is that I reduced the life of the rear main / oil pan gaskets.
 

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I'm the one that found the problem with the wipers and sent pics to Tom at BMR and the pic of the black redesigned can he posted is coming to me and I will update you all on the fit after I install it.

uploadfromtaptalk1449726517150.jpg uploadfromtaptalk1449726539880.jpg

I had high hopes for this can but over all I would say I am disappointed and feel like I paid full price to be the beta tester. It seems that after the beautiful welds the attention to detail stops.

I


1) A design that does not allow the wipers to work is a safety issue!!!
(It should be fixed now but should have never been an issue) Tom was quick to look into the issue and design a fix and even throw in powder coating for free but then still shipped the replacement snail mail I guess cause its taking 5 days to get from AZ to FL.
2) The original kit came in missing mounting hardware for the can and the AN fittings included should have been 90degree fittings so that you can use the factory engine cover for those of us not running the ZL1 lid. Again Tom at BMR was quick to send me the 90degree fittings but again this should have been part of the design process with the price tag of this can and not a lesson learned from a customer.
3) I have been trying to pin down where the burning smell I'm getting is originating and I though it was from just having my coupe lowered on eibachs and the tires were rubbing the splash guards a bit or something. I was wrong, no rubbing. So I figured new hoses breaking in or something, Nope still have that burning smell. And today I even saw smoke coming from the pass side of the hood and now I'm reading that the plumbing recommended by BMR can cause an oil leak!!!
Got a low oil level warning come on the other day that I quickly topped off and now it all makes sense... I probably developed a leak.
If it wasn't dark and raining I'd be outside checking the oil and looking for leaks.

BMR,
What is a High Crank Case pressure situation where the can needs to be vented other than Turbo'd because the only modifications my V has are Eibachs and a Airaid so why does mine have all the symptoms and what's the science behind why you recommended routing the lines that way in the first place cause it seems like it causes problems for everyone, even a stock V???

What's the point of designing it as a dual catch can but only use half or else you'll blow a gasket and start leaking oil!?!?!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 
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